VESPER LYND Eva Green clothes - 007 Museum

Vesper Lynd's purple dress from Casino Royale?

Like the title says, I'm looking for Vesper Lynd's purple dress, or something very similar. Anyone know where to find it?
Thanks!
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Putting Bond's revenge against Quantum at the centre of Quantum of Solace

Saw the post mentioning that no one has attempted to give Quantum of Solace a rewrite and decided to give it a shot. It was actually harder than I thought. Rewatching it I think many of the film’s issues comes from the director writer than writing. I think the generally plotting of the film is fairly decent, especially giving the ongoing writer’s strike at the time. The main issue is that there’s effectively two films going on: One in which Bond is hunting down Quantum seeking revenge for Vesper and one in which Bond goes rogue in order to stop the CIA financing a coup d’etat in Boliva. My main goal was to try better merge them into a more cohesive story. In particular I want to give Vesper’s former lover, Yusuf Kabira, (ie the reason she betrays Bond and then gets murdered in Casino Royale) more of a role, rather than just having him be relegated to a single scene at the end of the film.

The Changes

· Making Yusuf Kabira, Vesper’s former lover, a major character, effectively serving as the main henchman of the film
· Changing Camille’s backstory. Instead of being a Bolivian agent she’s the daughter of the current Bolivian president and she’s has also been seduced by Kabira. Quantum’s plan is to expose the relationship between the President’s daughter and a foreign agent, thus creating a political scandal that will pre-empt a coup d’état by General Medrano.
· We cut Dominic Greene and the Plot To Steal Bolivar’s Water entirely. We give most of Greene’s role to Mr White.
· Finally, we are going to play up the whole Bond Versus the CIA thing. Lets try and use Jefferey Wright more and give Felix a bit of a redemption arc

The new plot

We are going to cut the opening car chase entirely and start with Bond driving into the Sienna safehouse having captured Mr White at the end of Casino Royale. Waiting inside the safehouse are M and another agent called Yusuf Kabira. Bond can greet Kabira saying something like “How was Bolivia?” and he replies with something witty like “Very stimulating”. The interrogation goes the same way as the original as Kabira is revealed to be a double agent and helps Mr White escape. Bond chases Kabira across the rooftops of Sienna. They can briefly fight but Kabira is able to escape. Cut to the opening title sequence.
After the titles we see MI6 investigating Kabira’s London apartment. In a secret compartment they discovered files on Vesper Lynd including photos of Kabira and Vesper together. Bond is visibly shaken by this information and M asks him if Bond can be trusted to keep his feelings separate from his job. Bond assures M he will. He also suggests looking into Kabira’s recent mission in Bolivar. When they do, they discover that Kabira was having frequent meetings with a mysterious woman at a particular hotel and will soon meet her again.
Kabira meets the mysterious woman, who we learn is called Camille, in the hotel in Santa Cruz, Boliva. The two are clearly lovers. They go to their room but are ambushed by Bond waiting for them there. We then basically get the scene from the end of Quantum of Solace where Bond reveals who Kabira is to Camille and shows her the necklace he gave to Vesper, identical to one Kabira’s given to Camille. Camille is obviously shocked by this revelation. At gunpoint Bond orders the two of them into a car to drive to an airfield where MI6 is waiting to arrest Kabira. In the car Kabira taunts Bond about Vesper. The car is soon stopped by members of the Bolivian military led by a General Medrano.
Bond now finds himself being captured as he is separated from Kabira and Camille and taking to a different site. There he discovers Felix Leiter and several other CIA agents. Initially Bond is pleased to see an ally but quickly realises that Felix and the CIA are working with Medrano and Kabira. Leiter tries to justify himself saying that things are more complicated than they seem, and that MI6 has no business getting involved in Bolivia. He also reveals that Camille is the daughter of the Bolivian president. He pleads with Bond to go back to London and forget about what he has seen. Bond refuses and escapes leading to a chase between Bond and the CIA. Bond is able to make his way to the airfield where he leaves Bolivia, dejected after failing to capture Kabira and avenge Vesper.
We then see Leiter meeting with White and Medrano. This pretty much resembles the scene from the original film where the CIA strikes a non-interference deal with the pair in exchange for the USA gaining access to Bolivian oil. After Leiter leaves, Medrano tells White that he has held up his end of the bargain and accuses White of unnecessarily delays. White argues that they need the support of the other partners of “his organisation” before they can go ahead, and Medrano replies that perhaps he should speak to White’s partners in person.
MI6 discover that Medrano has booked a ticket to see an opera in Bregenz, Austria and Bond goes to investigate. We then get the scene from the original film where the leaders of Quantum have their meeting during the Opera. Medrano is also at the meeting and we hear the Quantum members give their assent to go ahead with Medrano and White’s plan to expose the relationship between Camille and Kabira (who will be presented as a British spy) thus creating a political scandal which will cause a crisis allowing Medrano to seize power. Afterwards Medrano will allow Quantum to take control of Bolivia’s oil fields. With Medrano is Camille who is clearly being held there against her will. When she excuses herself to go to the bathroom Medrano sends one of his men to watch her. Camille still attempts to escapes and Bond intervenes helping her but blowing his cover in the process and gets caught in a very public shoot out with Medrano’s men. Medrano and the other members of Quantum escape.
We then cut to London where we see M getting a dressing down from the foreign secretary in the aftermath of the shooting in Austria. The foreign secretary tells M that the Prime Minister has bowed to American pressure and order that all MI6 operations in South America be terminated. With no choice M calls Bond and orders him to return to England but Bond of course refuses. M once again asks if his desire to get revenge on Kabira for Vesper’s death is affecting his decision-making. Bond hangs up.
In a safehouse Bond and Camille watch as news of Camille’s relationship with Kabira makes international headlines and the crisis Medrano and White engineered begins to take shape. Bond and Camille open up to each other, with Bond hinting at his past with Vesper. They resolve to return to Bolivia and attempt to prevent Medrano’s coup d’état. Without MI6 aid Bond turns to Rene Mathis who, after being acquitted of being a double agent following Casino Royale, is living in retirement in the south of France. Mathis agrees to help them, and they use his private jet to fly to Bolivia.
As they reach Bolivian airspace two American fighter jets begin tailing them, ordering them to land. Bond, Mathis and Rene agree that their only option is to abandon the plane only to learn there’s only one parachute onboard. Mathis tells Bond and Camille to escape while he leads the Americans away, sacrificing himself. Bond tries to protest. Mathis tells Bond that Vesper did love him. As Bond and Camille cling to each other with the parachute they see Mathis’ plane get shot down.
Once they land, they make their way to Bolivia’s capital La Paz. Felix contacts Bond for a meeting, effectively offering a brief truce. Camille tells Bond its a trap, but Bond decides to go anyway. They meet in a bar and Bond is able to convince Felix that Medrano will betray the CIA and give Quantum access to the Bolivan oil fields. Felix tells Bond that they are currently being watched by other CIA agents and as soon as Bond leaves, they will try to kill him. Felix gives Bond a location to go to if he survives. Evading the American agents Bond goes to this location and discovers Felix has left him a file detailing the CIA’s involvement in the impending coup d’état.
We then see tanks rolling into La Paz as the Medrano’s coup d’état begins. Medrano arrives at the state television station to announce his takeover. Bond and Camille race to the station to try to stop him. Fighting their way through Medrano’s men they are confronted by Kabira. Bond and Kabira get locked in a one-on-one shootout as Camille goes to take on Medrano alone. She finds the studio where Medrano is broadcasting the announcement of his new rule. His men have all left to stop Bond leaving Medrano all alone. Camille shoots Medrano and starts showing the Felix’s evidence of the CIA’s involvement.
Mr White, watching this unfold, orders the broadcast be stopped by any means necessary. The tanks outside the television station suddenly begin firing on the building, reducing it to rubble.
We cut back to Bond and Kabira who are now fighting hand-to-hand. As the building starts to collapse Kabira becomes trapped under falling debris. In desperation he reaches out to Bond. Bond holds out his hand, only to drop Vesper’s necklace in front of him. He leaves Kabira to die. Finding Camille, the two escape the collapsing television station.
They go to the Bolivian Presidential Palace as the Bolivian military either retreats or surrenders around them. There Camille’s family is waiting. The two kiss before parting ways.
Cut to a few weeks later Bond meets Leiter on the National Mall in Washington D.C. Leiter tells Bond that Mr White and the other members of Quantum have all gone underground and can’t be found. Bond asks Leiter if he’s been reprimanded for the whole Bolivian affair and Leiter replies he’s being sent on a dead-end assignment to San Monique. The two part as friends. As Felix leaves Bond receives a call from M about his next mission.
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Quantum of Solace is worse than Spectre. Fight me.

So I went on a James Bond binge this weekend and watched all four Daniel Craig films. Casino Royale and Skyfall are both masterpieces. Spectre was meh, but it gave a sort of primal old-school Bond movie feel that I couldn't stop rewatching it. Quantum of Solace was absolutely horrid. Seeing it right after CR didn't exactly help it's image to say the least.
Dominic Greene is one of the most washed out villains ever seen on feature film. He literally just looks like an ordinary dude with bug eyes. Nothing frightening about him. The accent was atrocious and seemed forced. His costume was also dull, bland and had no character to it. What kind of mafia boss wears white dress shirts? There could have been so much more to "up" his villainous effect throughout the film.
Olga Kurylenko was weird in this movie too. Too cold of a demeanor and not nearly enough lines to emphasize character traits. There was something very "absent" about the portrayal, especially compared to someone like Vesper Lynd.
Daniel Craig wasn't too bad, but was lacking in attitude compared to Casino Royale. He didn't break the flim, though.
Although admittedly Spectre had a badly written villain played by Christoph Waltz, his henchman was FANTASTIC (absolute killer fight scenes in this movie as well). The locations were also far more interesting. A Lamborghini showdown in downtown Rome? A snowy chase in Austria? A hand-to-hand combat in a train in the middle of the North African desert? THAT'S what I call an action movie. Not some sinkhole revenge story and a Russian girl trying to defeat a chubby Spanish dude in an army uniform. Greene's "death" was also complete garbage. Bond just leaves him out in the desert. WTF?
Overall, Quantum of Solace was so cold and distant that you couldn't really connect with the characters. By all means, Camille Montes was a better Bond girl than Madeline Swan, but other than that, the bad guys were more pronounced in Spectre.
Spectre felt like a traditional action movie, comparable to stuff like the Transporter or Bourne series, which actually improves its standing as a Bond film. Also better humor and comedic relief by far. Quantum of Solace just seems laughable and Greene doesn't seem as dark and brooding as Blofeld. His demeanor was completely off, it felt like he had nothing to hide. Skyfall was quite a refresher after that shitshow of a movie.
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Casino Royale: Why It Worked (Retrospective on the Franchise)

One of the most critically acclaimed Bond films. It truly revived the franchise in a way that it had not been since the Connery days and while I strongly disagree with the comments about Craig being the best Bond since Connery, he debuted under the best circumstances. Casino Royale gets a lot of praise from the media for being “different” from other films while some fans deride it for the same reason, calling Daniel Craig’s Bond an emotionless thug. The latter group is somewhat correct, if referring to Quantum of Solace. The former group, is a bit overblown in their praise, forgetting that changing too many things could run the risk of losing what made something great in the first place, which happened in some areas with Craig’s subsequent films. In my opinion, however, Casino Royale is not a “deconstruction” of the Bond films that stripped back the gadgets, girls, and humor that defined the films, but a reconstruction that stayed true to the original novels and simply improved upon the many great things its predecessor did while getting rid of the fluff.
Looking back, Connery started out perfectly in his first two films. He added his own charm and wit to the original character, making for a perfect lead actor while keeping the more dubious aspects of the character. Unfortunately, Goldfinger marked the beginning of Bond becoming a caricature, a perfectly dressed gentleman who saved the day as effortlessly as he displayed charisma. While some of the original Connery returned in Thunderball, his last two films doubled down on Goldfinger’s success and felt like a pale shadow of his former self.
George Lazenby, despite only appearing in one film, managed to remain unobscured because he appeared in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, a crowning moment for the franchise that stripped back the gadgets, girls (kind of), and humor. Rather strange, considering Casino Royale was adored for doing the same thing, but gets a better reception from audiences (critics and fans have given Lazenby’s film its due for decades now).
Roger Moore, despite the silliness of his films and the decreasing credibility the franchise had because of his age as the films progressed, deserves credit for allowing the films to develop differently rather than just copying the Connery films. Moore could never compete with Connery’s rugged macho persona and instead became more suave and gentlemanly, with even more emphasis on the humor. The franchise had been heading down a path where the films could not be taken seriously and Moore allowed them to embrace it. Say what you want about films like Moonraker, but that was the direction the producers wanted to take and much of how one perceives it is based on how silly or serious they want their Bond films to be, a testament to how Moore allowed the films to vary in tone. For Your Eyes Only, despite not being a particularly strong film in my opinion, stripped back the gadgets, girls, and humor (kind of). Casino Royale gets praise for being more realistic and grounded than Die Another Day, but For Your Eyes Only did the same after Moonraker, albeit to a lesser extent. Moore proved that he could still portray a more serious Bond and the result was one of his best outings. Unfortunately, the silliness still lingered and Bond faced competition from other heavy-hitters in the eighties. While I enjoy Octopussy and think A View To A Kill deserves to exist because of its awesome score and Christopher Walken, Moore should have left earlier.
Timothy Dalton still remains underappreciated by critics and audiences (“Mainstream” media sites still rank his films in the twenties) despite having a cult following among fans. While I am not the most knowledgeable of the novels, I remember enough from the ones I read that Dalton fit the literary version almost perfectly and I still maintain that he is closer than even Craig or Connery to Fleming’s Bond. The Living Daylights and Licence To Kill are both extremely well-done films, that while suffering from a lackluster director far better at executing action than story and poor production values, managed to be the closest in spirit to Connery’s early films. It is rather unfair that Dalton is labelled the “proto-Craig” when he was closer to the novels, a bit too close. One area where Craig is superior to Dalton is the charisma. Dalton lacked the “it-factor” that his predecessors had and while he was not beholden to following what Connery started, the public perception about the larger-than-life Bond hurt his era.
People began rejecting the caricature Bond had become with the Pierce Brosnan era, which had the worst scripts in my opinion. GoldenEye was a pop-culture hit and its legacy as the “only good Brosnan” film was aided by a video game that I would rather go back to than the film itself. It was a well-rounded out film, though I would argue that it is not one of the best since several others were less derivative and excelled in some areas more than it did. Brosnan’s era dropped in quality with films even more derivative than his debut, repeating GoldenEye’s mistake of ultimately wasting interesting plot-points in favor of falling back on the tried-and-true tropes. I still love Tomorrow Never Dies though. The end result was Die Another Day, which saw the producers in the same situation they found themselves in after Moonraker. They had to return to Bond’s roots, and for the first time in its history, truly delivered an almost flawless product that learned from everything the films had done.
Some look back on the pre-Craig films and scoff at them, finding them too cheesy and not serious enough. However, quite a few Bond films were serious and faithful to the source material; they just happened not to do it as well as Casino Royale, with the exception of From Russia With Love, which is the closest in reception to it. On Her Majesty’s Secret Service suffered from a rather lackluster star, who despite the arguments from people such as myself who enjoyed his vulnerability compared to Connery and acting during the ending, hurt the reputation of a great film. For Your Eyes Only set the tone for the eighties films, but still had some of the Moore silliness. The Living Daylights and Licence To Kill also suffered from tonal issues, to a lower extent in my opinion. Dalton gave very committed performances, but the other members of the production were not quite as willing to commit to such a radical change and never went the extra mile like Casino Royale despite delivering two top tier Bond films. Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli finally realized that they had to give the character justice after they restricted Pierce Brosnan from reaching his full potential. The one-liners worked with Connery and Moore, but they did not with Dalton and Brosnan, showing a lack of confidence in their lead actors’ acting ability that they did not with Craig.
Rebooting the franchise meant the producers could start a clean slate, take all the great things of the past twenty films, and put it in one film. I prefer Dalton overall, but Craig’s debut performance was the perfect combination of the literary and cinematic Bond. He retained the cold nature Dalton brought to the role while keeping some of the wit Connery brought into focus. Craig gets some praise for being more brutal with the bathroom opening frequently highlighted, but I think that it rather misses the point of the plot. Bond went from being a reckless, violent gunman to being a cold man who tries to hide it with charm and witty lines, closer in personality to the previous Bonds. It has even been brought up that Vesper influenced Bond’s dress style, going from wearing casual clothes to a three-piece suit in the ending. Bond holding the machine gun in such fancy clothes showed how far he had become since the prologue, no longer wearing his Oxford-styled suits with disdain. Even Craig’s hair, which is flat down throughout the film, is a bit sharper in the end, showing that Bond now puts more thought into the way he appears. Getting some input into the character also meant Craig had the freedom Dalton and Brosnan were unfortunately never afforded. Only Craig could have pulled off the torture scene. Connery and Moore were too untouchable; Lazenby and Brosnan were not the best when it came to dramatic scenes; Dalton lacked the humanity that made Craig more relatable, though their interpretations are two sides of the same coin.
Casino Royale was inspired by the Bourne films and Batman Begins, but still feels very Bondian. The tropes Goldfinger introduced may be gone, but those from the novels and first two films remained. The film adds scenes set in the Bahamas, which reminds one of Dr. No and Thunderball. The Aston Martin DB5 returns, continuing the nostalgia for the Connery era which the producers had been milking since GoldenEye, and exacerbated in future Craig films. Bond’s characterization is also close to Connery’s first two films and Lazenby and Dalton’s films. The film does not feel like a complete departure from its predecessors, but more of a return to form. For me personally, I like the films like From Russia With Love and On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, which retain the cinematic Bond thrills while adding more depth to the plot and characters.
Craig’s debut set the bar high and I think his follow-ups learned the wrong lessons from it. After being praised for departing from Bond’s roots, the writers went further and made a film that does not feel Bondian at times. Criticize Licence To Kill for being an eighties action film all you want, but the story felt more like classic Bond than most of its predecessors. While Quantum of Solace had great action, cinematography, interesting plot points (holding the water of a country ransom does not seem so funny now?) and had some parallels between Dalton and Craig (Dalton snaps and rejects MI6 to become a rogue agent hellbent on revenge, Craig never actively seeks revenge and despite the brutal moments he finds himself in, keeps his composure), it badly-edited and suffered from an undercooked script. On the other hand, Skyfall is a beautifully shot film that like GoldenEye, has a meandering plot focused on meta-commentary discussing Bond’s relevance. I would still put Skyfall in my top 10, but it is not as original or groundbreaking as the critics would have you think. Finally, Spectre repeated the same mistake the Brosnan films did: fall back on good old nostalgia. This time, the writers tried to fuse a Connery era plot with Craig’s darker aspects, making for a charmless bore with some really misguided intentions (Brofeld, anyone?). I eagerly await No Time To Die like everyone else and hope that it manages to end off the era of one of the best Bonds with a bang.
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Film Rankings with Explanations, Ratings, and Tiers

During quarantine, I've had the opportunity to rewatch every movie in relatively short succession. I've seen them all 2-10 times and have been a lifelong Bond fan. I enjoy every Bond film, even the "bad" ones, but I wanted to try and rank them. I used a scoring system to help me, but ultimately went with my gut (e.g. License to Kill MUST be better than The World is Not Enough). I thought a tier system of ranking was useful, because it really is splitting hairs to rank some of these. Feel free to critique my ratings, my ratings weightings, and opinions!

You could say I have too much time on my hands
Tier 7: The Worst
  1. Die Another Day: Best Sword Fight
- Why it's not irredeemable: For being the lowest ranked film on this list, it's not without its moments. Bond getting caught, tortured, then escaping from MI6 was interesting and novel. The ice hotel was neat, as well as the chase scene. I'll even defend the much maligned invisible car, as the Aston Martin Vanquish is quite a car.
- Why it's not higher: Personally, I think Halle Berry is a terrible Bond girl, alternating between damsel in distress and super woman as the plot demands it. Moreover, Graves and the plot in general is pretty cheesy and boring. Perhaps most damaging is the deadly serious tone of the movie, which doesn't even provide the fun and excitement Brosnan's films generally provide the viewer.
- Most under-appreciated part: The fencing scene is the best action scene of the entire movie. It's surprising it took Bond this long to fence, but seeing them go at it across the club was a blast.

Tier 6: Disappointing
  1. Quantum of Solace: Best Car Chase
- Why it's this high: The action is quite good, likely meriting the distinction of the best car chase in the entire series (the pre-credits sequence). Mathis is a good ally and it is sad to see him go.
- Why it's not higher: My biggest beef with Craig's Bond films is that they are too serious, so when the plot and script isn't top-notch, the movie watching experience is just kind of dull. Quantum of Solace takes a bold risk in making the first Bond sequel, but unfortunately it's just not that good. Greene seems like a rather pathetic Bond villain, and his henchman (the worst in the series?) ends up in a neck-brace after getting tripped by Camilla. Also, the shaky cam is distracting and exhausting.
- Most under-appreciated part: I actually thing the theme song is pretty good! Maybe I'm just too much of a Jack White groupie, but I think it rocks.

  1. Moonraker: Best Locales
- Why it's this high: I'm pleased to see Jaws making a return, as he is an amazing henchman. On that note, the pre-credits sequence with Bond and Jaws falling out of the plane is exhilarating. Holly Goodhead is a very good Bond girl, beautiful, smart, and competent. Roger Moore always does an excellent job playing the role with suavity and wit.
- Why it's not higher: Gosh it's cheesy. Particularly egregious is Jaws' love story. The theme song is terrible and Bond doesn't have any solid allies besides Goodhead and Jaws.
- Most under-appreciated part: They really go all out with the settings here. Obviously, space is pretty polarizing, but I think Bond clearly should go to space at SOME point during the series. In addition, Italy and Brazil were gorgeous views, while Drax's estate is magnificent.

  1. Spectre: Best Shooting
- Why it's this high: Rewatching this for the second time, I realized Lea Seydoux does a good job as the Bond girl, and it's actually quite believable she and James could work out, as she is the daughter of an assassin and can understand him (as Blofeld points out). Seeing Bond show off his marksmanship was quite satisfying, especially that one long shot during the escape from Blofeld's compound. Bonus points for Bond's DB10 and resurrecting the DB5.
- Why it's not higher: The fatal flaw of this film is making Blofeld Bond's adopted brother. How did Bond not recognize him? How is Blofeld able to keep himself secret from British intelligence yet every criminal worth his salt knows of him? The worst part is that it actually cheapens the plot of the other Craig movies. I believe the Bond franchise should stay clear from sequels from here on out. Yes, they can weave a great story if done correctly, but it's so much more difficult to make great sequels (e.g. Star Wars only made two worthy sequels in seven tries) than to do one-offs. As usual for a Craig film, Bond has little charisma (save for his surprisingly good rapport with Moneypenny) and little in the way of jokes to lighten the mood.
- Most under-appreciated part: The train fight scene with Dave Bautista is great! Gosh it was awesome to see them go at it, break through walls, and a priceless expression on Bautista's face when he knows he's done. Bautista is the first decent henchman since the 90s, so glad to see the series go back to this staple.

  1. The Man with the Golden Gun: Best Potential, Worst Execution
- Why it's this high: This Bond movie frustrates more than any other, as it has the potential to be an all-time great. Bond's debriefing starts off with promise, as it turns out the world's top assassin is gunning for Bond! For the first time in the series, Bond seems vulnerable! M makes a hilarious quip as to who would try to kill Bond ("jealous husbands ... the list is endless"). Furthermore, the legendary Christopher Lee is possible the best Bond villain, a rare peer of 007.
- Why it's not higher: Unfortunately, the movie opts to change course so that it's just Maud Adams trying to get Bond to kill Scaramanga. Goodnight is beautiful, but maybe the most inept Bond girl of all-time. They used a SLIDE WHISTLE, ruining one of the coolest Bond stunts ever (the car jump).
- Most under-appreciated part: Nick Nack is a splendid henchman, showing the role can be more than just a strongman.

  1. Diamonds Are Forever: Great Beginning and Ending, but Bad Everywhere Else
- Why it's this high: Is there another Bond with such a great contrast between the beginning/ending and everything in between? Connery shows his tough side, as he muscles his way through the pre-credits scene. Particularly good was the part where he seduces the woman, then uses her bikini top to choke her. At the end, Bond expertly uses his wine knowledge to detect something is amiss, then dispatches Kidd and Wint in style. Other cool scenes include Bond scaling the building to reach Blofeld and Bond driving the Mustang through the alley.
- Why it's not higher: This is one of the films that I find myself liking less and less over time. Vegas, and especially the space laboratory scene, just seem cheesy. Connery is officially too old at this point, and Jill St. John just isn't a very compelling Bond girl. I would've preferred to have seen more of Plenty O'Toole, but alas 'twas not meant to be. Leiter is uninspired as well. Having Bond go after Blofeld for the millionth time just seems tired at this point.
- Most under-appreciated part: Mr. Kidd and Wint are the creepiest henchmen in the Bond universe, but I'd argue they are some of the best. Their banter and creative modes of execution are quite chilling and thrilling.

  1. A View to a Kill: Best Theme
- Why it's this high: Is it a hot take to not have View in the bottom five? Let me explain. I contend Duran Duran's theme is the very best. The ending fight scene on the Golden Gate Bridge is actually one of the most iconic ending set pieces in the series. The plot is stellar on paper, as the horse racing part was a very Bondian side story, and the idea of an attack on Silicon Valley actually seems even more plausible today.
- Why it's not higher: It's self-evident that Moore is way too old for the part. Some parts are just mind-blowingly ridiculous, such as the fire truck chase scene through San Francisco and the part where Stacey is caught unaware by a blimp behind her. Speaking of Stacey, she may be beautiful, but she spends most of the movie shrieking whenever something goes wrong.
- Most under-appreciated part: The scene with Bond and Ivanova is cool (I always like it when he interacts with other spies) and quite entertaining how he fools her with the cassettes.

Tier 5: Below Average
  1. Octopussy: The Most Characteristically Roger Moore Bond Film
- Why it's this high: Maud Adams has great screen presence as Octopussy, and her Amazonian-like women are cool to watch fight. Bond's deft swipe of the egg was nicely done. On a related aside, I wish Bond films would emphasize Bond's intellect more, as it seems the 60s and 70s films would allow Bond to showcase his vast knowledge more frequently than he does today. Gobinda is a fierce henchman, while India in general is a cool location. The plot is realistic, yet grand (war-mongering Russian general tries to detonate a nuke to get NATO to turn on itself).
- Why it's not higher: This is the first Moore film where he simply was too old and shouldn't have been cast. Yes, it's too cheesy at times, most infamously during the Tarzan yell. Bond also doesn't use any cool vehicles.
- Most under-appreciated part: People tend to focus too much on Bond dressing as a clown, but the scene where Bond furiously tries to get to the bomb in time to defuse it is one of the tensest moments in the series. Moore's "Dammit there's a bomb in there!" really demonstrated the gravity of the situation (I get goosebumps during that part).

  1. Tomorrow Never Dies: Most Tasteful Humor
- Why it's this high: Brosnan really settles into the role well here. He gives the most charismatic Bond performance in 15 years or so. His quip "I'm just here at Oxford, brushing up on a little Danish" is an all-time great Bond line. Teri Hatcher is stunning as Paris Carver, delivering a memorable performance with her limited screen time. The plot is original and ages well, highlighting the potential downsides of media power, while Carver is an above average villain.
- Why it's not higher: Wai Lin is good for action, but the chemistry between her and Bond is non-existent. By the end of the movie, Pryce just seem silly (especially the scene where he mocks Wai Lin's martial arts skills). There aren't any good Bond allies, as Jack Wade doesn't impress in his return to the franchise. In general though, the movie has few things terribly wrong with it, it just doesn't excel in many ways.
- Most under-appreciated part: Dr. Kaufman is hysterical. At first, I thought "this is weird," but by the end of the scene I'm cracking up. I genuinely wish they found someway to bring him back for World, but c'est la vie.

  1. The World Is Not Enough: Less than the Sum of its Parts
- Why it's this high: According to my spreadsheet, this is a top 10 Bond film, while on my first watch on this film I thought it was bottom five. I think the truth is that it's somewhere in between. I like the settings, everything from the temporary MI-6 headquarters to Azerbaijan. Elektra is an all-time great Bond girl, with a nice plot twist and character arc. The glasses where Bond sees through women's clothing are hilarious. The sense of danger is strong, with everyone from Bond to M being in danger. The return of Zukovsky is a nice plus.
- Why it's not higher: I think two things really doom this film. First, Renard is totally wasted a henchman. The idea of him not feeling pain is a cool one, but he just seems boring and extraneous. I don't even think Carlyle acted poorly, he was just misused. Secondly, the ending (after Bond killing Elektra which is quite good) is rather terrible. The whole scene in the sub just isn't entertaining or engaging.
- Most under-appreciated part: I'm going to defend Denise Richards as Christmas Jones. Although no Ursula Andress, Richards is absolutely gorgeous and did not actively make Bond's mission more difficult, which is more than some Bond girls can say *cough Britt Ekland. In particular, I found her introductory scene to be quite memorable and convincing. Also, the Christmas quip at the end is quite cheeky.

Tier 4: Solid
  1. The Living Daylights:
- Why it's this high: Dalton brings a breath of fresh air to the franchise here. His more serious take makes for interesting movies that seem more unique than most. I'm happy to see this subreddit appreciate Dalton more than the casual fun does, but I wouldn't go as far as the Dalton fanboys and say he's the best Bond or anything like that. I do wish he got the role sooner and did more films. Moving on to Daylights, it's got a good intro for Dalton and good plot in general. Surprisingly, Bond's fidelity doesn't bother me one bit, as it actually makes sense that Kara falls in love with James by the end, given all they've gone through.
- Why it's not higher: The biggest reason is that the villain is just terrible. Whitaker seems silly and pathetic, a terrible contrast to Dalton's serious nature. I think Whitaker might be the worst in the series, and a Bond movie can't be great without a good villain. Also, Dalton doesn't have much charm and is abysmal at one-liners, which, in my opinion, IS a facet of the perfect James Bond.
- Most under-appreciated part: The Aston Martin Vantage is a beautiful car, and the chase scene across the ice is great! It's both exciting and funny! Not sure why people don't talk about this chase scene and this car more; it's arguably the highlight of the movie for me.

  1. Thunderball: The Most Beautiful
- Why it's this high: Thunderball used to be top five for me and here is why. The underwater scenes, the setting, the score, and the Bond girls are beautiful even to this day. Domino is excellent, while Volpe is a tour de force, oozing sexuality and danger. I think the underwater parts are interesting and novel, creating a staple of sorts for the franchise. The DB 5 is always welcome, and the jetpack use was quite cool for the time (and to some extent now).
- Why it's not higher: Some would say it's boring, while I would more generously admit the plot is slow. Furthermore, the theme song is all-time bad (apparently they could have used Johnny Cash!!!), and there is no great henchman for Bond to dispatch.
- Most under-appreciated part: Two plot ideas I liked a lot: Bond being injured and needing rehab, plus the part where all the 00s meet up and then are sent to the corners of the globe.

  1. Never Say Never Again: Guilty Pleasure
- Why it's this high: Rewatching Never for the third time, I was struck by how fun this movie is. It's exciting, funny, and fast-paced. Basically, it's a more exciting version of Thunderball, with better pacing and better humor. I think Irvin Kershner did a great job managing this star studded cast. Carrera is a firecracker as Blush, Sydow is a convincing Blofeld, and Basinger is a classic Bond girl. Connery clearly has a blast returning to the role, doing a great job despite his advanced age. If anything, this one might not be ranked high enough.
- Why it's not higher: The music is terrible. Normally I don't notice these things, but one can't help but notice how dreadful this one is. The theme is awful as well. I'd argue this is the worst music of any Bond film.
- Most under-appreciated part: The humor! This is one of the funniest Bonds, as I found myself laughing out loud at various parts (e.g. Mr Bean!).

  1. The Spy Who Loved Me: Best Intro
- Why it's this high: There's a lot to love about this one, so I get why this ranks highly for many. It is simply the best introduction, starting with Bond romancing a woman, followed by a skii chase, then jumping off the cliff and pulling the Union Jack parachute! The Lotus is a top 3 Bond car. Jaws is a superb henchman. Triple X was an excellent Bond girl, deadly, charming, and beautiful. Of course, Moore is charming and the locations are exotic (Egypt was a cool locale). If I had to pick one Moore movie for a newcomer to watch, it would be this one.
- Why it's not higher: The theme song is bad, and Stromberg is a below average villain. I also think the last 45 minutes or so of the movie kind of drags.
- Most under-appreciated part: The whole dynamic between Bond and Triple X is great. Whenever Bond movies show Bond squaring off against other spies (see View to a Kill, Goldeneye) it's just a pleasure to watch.

  1. Live and Let Die: Most Suave
- Why it's this high: Roger Moore superbly carves out his own take on Bond in an excellent addition to the franchise. The boat chase is my favorite in the series, and Live and Let Die is my second favorite theme. Jane Seymour is a good Bond girl, while Tee Hee and Kananga are a solid villain/henchman duo. Unpopular opinion: I find J.W. Pepper to be hilarious.
- Why it's not higher: The introduction isn't very good, as Bond isn't even included! The second climax with the voodoo isn't great. Bond blowing up Kananga has aged terribly.
- Most under-appreciated part: When Bond is visited in his apartment by M and Moneypenny, Bond rushes to hide his girl from his coworkers. Finally, when they leave and he unzips the dress with his magnetic watch is one of the best uses of a Bond gadget in the series, showcasing why Moore might be the most charming Bond of them all.

  1. You Only Live Twice: Best Blofeld
- Why it's this high: Just your classic, fun Sean Connery Bond movie. It was a great decision to send Bond to Japan for his first Asian visit, giving the movie a fresh feel. The ending set piece battle is potentially the best of this staple of 60s/70s Bonds. Tiger Tanaka is one of Bond's cooler allies. Pleasance killed it as Blofeld; when I think of Blofeld, I think of his take. In what could have been cheesy, he is actually somewhat frightening.
- Why it's not higher: The whole "we need to make you look Japanese" part seems both unrealistic (who is he really fooling?) plus surprisingly impotent coming from Tiger Tanaka who seems to be a competent and connected man otherwise. Honestly though, this movie doesn't have a major weakness.
- Most under-appreciated part: The fight scene with the guard in the executive's office is probably the best hand-to-hand fight in the series up until that point.

Tier 3: Excellent
  1. Dr. No: The Most Spy-Like
- Why it's this high: Nearly 60 years later, this film is still a blast to watch, due in no small part to its focus on the little things of being a spy. I adore the scenes where Bond does the little things spies (presumably) do, such as putting a hair across the door, or showing Bond playing solitaire while waiting to spring his trap on Prof. Dent. I also enjoy the suspense of Bond sleuthing around the island, while he and the viewer are completely unaware of whom the villain is until quite late in the film. It's easy to take for granted now, but this film established so many series traditions that were ingenious. My personal favorite is Bond's introduction at the card table: "Bond .... James Bond."
- Why it's not higher: The film just doesn't have the payoff it deserves. Maybe it's just a result of the time and budget, but from the point Bond escapes on, it's just mediocre. Particularly egregious is the "fight" between Dr. No and Bond where No meets his demise.
- Most under-appreciated part: Ursula Andress was a surprisingly well developed Bond girl, with a shockingly violent backstory (she was raped!). Obviously, she is beautiful and the beach scene is iconic, but I was pleasantly surprised to conclude she is more than just eye candy.

  1. License to Kill: The Grittiest
- Why it's this high: On my first watch, this was my least favorite Bond film, as I thought it was too dark and violent to befit 007. By my third time watching, I've decided it's actually one of the best. Fortunately, I don't have to go on my "Ackshually, Dalton did a good job" rant with this subreddit. I liked the wedding intro and the concept of a revenge arc for Leiter (although come on he should've been killed by a freaking shark). Also, Lamora and (especially) Bouvier are great Bond girls. Bouvier is both competent and beautiful, and it's great to see Bond choose her at the end.
- Why it's not higher: The theme song is atrocious, Dalton is so angry (dare I say charmless?) the whole time it's almost puzzling why Bouvier and Lamora fall for him, and Bond doesn't use any cool vehicles.
- Most under-appreciated part: Sanchez is actually a sneaky good Bond villain.

  1. For Your Eyes Only: The Most Underrated
- Why it's this high: I think Moore is a bit underrated as Bond. Yes, he was too old towards the end and yes, his movies were at times too campy, but he himself played the role admirably. He was the most charming and witty of all the Bonds, so by the time he got his first relatively serious plot to work with, he hit it out of the park. Anyhow, the climactic mountaintop assault is one of my favorite Bond action climaxes. Columbo is one of the best Bond allies, and the plot twist where he turns out to be good and Kristatos bad was well-done.
- Why it's not higher: The intro is just silly. Bibi's romantic infatuation with Bond is just ...er... uncomfortable?
- Most under-appreciated part: The theme song is a banger. What a chorus!

Tier 2: Exceptional
  1. Skyfall: The Sharpest Film (From Plot to Aesthetics)
- Why it's this high: One of the best plots of the entire series. The idea of an older Bond who had lost a step, along with making M the focus point of the movie, works very well. Seeing Bond's childhood home is also pretty cool. Bardem's take on Silva is delightful and a lot of fun to watch. Even the cinematography is a series peak, while Adele's them is excellent.
- Why it's not higher: One thing most Craig Bond films suffer from is the lack of a Bond-worthy henchman. Skyfall is no exception. More importantly, Bond girls are mostly irrelevant to the film. Yes, Severine is both beautiful and interesting, but she's scarcely twenty minutes of the film.
- Most under-appreciated part: Setting the new supporting characters up nicely. The Moneypenny backstory was well-done. Casting Ralph Fiennes as the new M is a great choice in of itself, but he also got a nice chuck of background story to help us going forward.

  1. Casino Royale: The First Bond Film I'd Show a Series Newcomer
- Why it's this high: Craig's take on Bond feels like a breath of fresh air. In particular, his hand-to-hand combat scenes are so much better (and more believable) than any other Bond. The parkour chase scene is one of the best chase scenes in the series. Le Chifre is an excellent villain, but, more importantly, Vesper is an all-time great Bond girl. The conversation between Vesper and Bond on the train is probably the most interesting of any film. Bonus points for Jeffrey Wright as Leiter and the Aston Martin DBS.
- Why it's not higher: There are hardly any humorous parts or much charm displayed by Bond in general. More importantly, the movie should have just ended when Bond wakes up in rehab. The rest of the movie feels confused and superfluous.
- Most under-appreciated part: The decision to change from chemin de fer to poker makes for much better (and understandable!) cinema. The poker scenes are the best of Bond's many gambling scenes throughout the series.

  1. Goldeneye: The Most Fun
- Why it's this high: Wow, rewatching Goldeneye I was struck by how entertaining the whole thing is. The opening jump is breath taking, the scene where Bond drives his evaluator around is hilarious, and Xenia Onatopp is a livewire. Sean Bean is a formidable villain as 006, and a great foil to James. Bond and Judi Dench's first scene together is amazing. Goldeneye feels like the first modern Bond, yet so true to the predecessors. Wade and especially Zukovsky are excellent allies.
- Why it's not higher: Simonova is a forgettable Bond girl. She's not annoying, unattractive, or acted poorly, but is just below average in most regards (looks, back story, chemistry with Bond, plot).
- Most under-appreciated part: the action is just so much better than any Bond before it

  1. From Russia with Love: The Best Henchman (Red Grant)
- Why it's this high: Interesting settings, beautiful women, and an engaging story make this a classic. I'm not the first to point out that the scenes with Grant and Bond aboard the train are some of the best in the entire series. Grant is one of the few villains who feels like a match for 007. Furthermore, the addition of Desmond Llewyn as Q was crucial and Kerim Bey is one of the better Bond allies.
- Why it's not higher: The helicopter scene should've just been omitted, especially when combined with the subsequent boat chase. It's just awkward to watch.
- Most under-appreciated part: The gypsy scenes are quite exotic and entertaining.

  1. On Her Majesty's Secret Service: The Most Heartfelt
- Why it's this high: James and Tracy's love story is charming, and when she dies at the end, this is the one and only time in the entire series where the viewer feels genuinely sad. Diana Rigg did an excellent job convincing the audience Bond could finally fall in love with one girl. The skiing scenes were beautifully filmed, and the score was exemplary. Personally, I quite liked Lazenby's take; however, some of his lines and jokes fall flat. To his credit, he looks and acts like Bond more than any other actor.
- Why it's not higher: Honestly, it does drag at times in the first half, plus there is no theme song!
- Most under-appreciated part: Bond's Aston Martin DBS is a beautiful car, combining 60's sports-car beauty with Aston Martin's elegance.

Tier 1: The Best
  1. Goldfinger: The quintessential Bond
- Why it's this high: From the opening ("Positively shocking") to the seduction of Pussy Galore at the end, this film has it all. Goldfinger is an all time great villain, while Odd Job is an exceptional henchman. Connery delivers a master performance, and drives THE classic Bond Car, ejector seat included. The reason I put it #1 is not necessarily because it is the best film (although it is great), it checks all the boxes of what a perfect Bond film should do.
- Why it's not higher: I cannot think of any notable imperfections.
- Most under-appreciated part: The golf scene between Bond and Goldfinger is a delight to watch, demonstrating Bond's wits for the first and only time on the golf course.
submitted by BoolaBoola19 to JamesBond [link] [comments]

Casino Royale is the Goldfinger of the 21st Century.

It is widely agreed upon that Goldfinger is the greatest Bond film of all time. It has great writing, acting, iconic scenes, introduction of the classic Bond formula such as visits to Q and the use of amazing gadgets. Casino Royale has reinvigorated Bond and did it in a Post 9/11 world. Bond was made cool again, made contemporary, and relevant. We start the film with a foot chase, the first in Bond history. It was epic. Bond shows how he is rough around the edges, kills first never asks questions. He is vulnerable with the women he is with such as Vesper. He allows himself to feel emotion through love and murder. In the stairway scene when he kills the 2 guys from the Congo he goes back to his room to clean up and is shaken by what he has done. We’ve never seen that before. Goldfinger and Casino Royale have an iconic scene of torture (Laser table/ testicle whipping) . Probably the most famous in Bond history. Granted the villains are very different but they are portrayed by great actors, Gert Frobe and Mads Mikkelson. The end of Casino shows how Bond has hardened and become cold to falling in love over the betrayal of Vesper (we wouldn’t know until the next movie she was dooped), he is also more tactical and doesn’t just kill (shoots Mr. White in the leg, also in Skyfall he’s pissed when he lets Patrice fall out the window. Showing character development that he didn’t want to kill him). He shows up wearing a 3 piece Brioni suit (Vesper tells him on the train that he doesn’t care how he dresses) and utters the classic “ Bond... James Bond”, for the first time, then the classic theme song plays for the first time. As a reimagining and update of the James Bond legend, Casino Royale has set the bar so high that I believe it will be the Goldfinger of this century.
submitted by HistoryGuardian to JamesBond [link] [comments]

Eva Green interview, April 2020

I don't know if I can publish this article here, it might be deleted due to copyright, but here it is.
Eva Green on coping with crippling anxiety: ‘I’m very shy… I wish I was a silent movie star’
Gavanndra Hodge25 APRIL 2020 • 5:00 AM
I meet the actor Eva Green on one of those strange, early March days when we are yet to truly understand the implications of coronavirus – when people still hug each other and say, ‘Whoops, sorry!’ afterwards. Which is exactly what Green and I do when she arrives at Clifton Nurseries, a chic garden centre and café near her north London flat. She’s dressed in a black woolly hat, huge black puffer jacket and sunglasses.
‘Let me show you something so scary,’ she says, showing me a passage on her phone from Dean Koontz’s 1981 thriller The Eyes of Darkness, which seems to predict the pandemic with eerie prescience, appropriate passages circled in red.
Meanwhile, Green’s mother, who lives in Paris and to whom she speaks daily, has been telling her not to shake hands with anyone, not even to leave the house. Yet here we are, sitting perilously close, ordering fresh mint tea, ready to talk about Green’s new film, Proxima, directed by César-winning French screenwriter and director Alice Winocour.
In the film, Green plays French astronaut Sarah, who is preparing to depart for a year-long mission. But despite the hi-tech robotics and presence of Matt Dillon, Proxima is not your average space movie; it is not concerned with distant galaxies or alien life forms. The film is about Earth and the things that tether us to it. Sarah is an astronaut, but she is also a single parent; her daughter Stella played by the excellent 10-year-old actor Zélie Boulant.
‘It is a love story between a mother and a daughter,’ says Green. ‘And these people who are going to the International Space Station, all the way to Mars, they will lose sight of the Earth. It is like a self-sacrifice, like a death.’
In preparation for the role, Green undertook an arduous fitness regime with a Russian instructor in Cologne. ‘He was so harsh, treating me like a real astronaut. In the end he was so rude and mean that it became funny.’ She also spent time at astronaut-training centres, like Star City in Kazakhstan. ‘That was my favourite thing. I felt like I had entered a sacred realm.’
The film is a departure in many ways for Green. In Proxima, she is make-up-free, dressed mostly in overalls, dealing with the struggles of a working mother. It is beautiful and solemn – and her performance has been described as a career-best.
Green is probably most famous, though, for her glamorous role as Vesper Lynd in the 2006 reboot of the James Bond franchise, Casino Royale, featuring Daniel Craig as 007. At first she didn’t want to audition for the part (in retrospect, she says she was being ‘pretentious’), but when she read the script, she changed her mind. ‘I thought it was a very strong role. But I didn’t like when they said “Bond girl”. I would say, “I am not a Bond Girl, I am a character.”’
She loved making the film, though: ‘The set was joyous. Barbara Broccoli is amazing, one of the best producers I have ever worked with. I wish they were all like her: passionate, kind, caring.’ Green admits that she has had less pleasant experiences on set. ‘Of course, a lot. It is hard; it is the anti-glamour.’
Eva Green was born and raised with her non-identical twin, Joy, in Paris. Her mother, Marlène Jobert, was a successful actor who gave up her career for her family, and her Swedish father, Walter, is a dentist. It was, Green says, a very ‘Parisian bourgeois’ upbringing. She attended drama school in Paris, followed by a 10-week acting course at Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art in London. ‘It was very intense, in a good way. But because my English was not very good, when I had to do Shakespeare, it was very hard. Often I couldn’t even understand what the teachers were asking me to do,’ she says.
Back in Paris, Green won parts in a couple of plays, but had such a bleak time, getting stage fright and ‘having blanks’, that she considered giving up acting. It was, she says, the Italian film director Bernardo Bertolucci who saved her. She was in her early 20s, when she heard about a Bertolucci audition. ‘I was obsessed with him, obsessed with Last Tango [in Paris]’, she says.
The audition was relaxed, and soon afterwards she was offered the lead role in The Dreamers, an adaptation of a Gilbert Adair novel – sexy and incestuous, and suffused with the riotous politics of Paris in 1968. ‘My mother told me not to do it,’ Green says. ‘She was afraid that I was too sensitive, that he [Bertolucci] was going to be quite violent with me,’ she says, referencing the fact that the actress Maria Schneider had found the making of Last Tango in Paris emotionally challenging. ‘And that it would destroy me for life. I was like, are you kidding? It was the chance of a lifetime.’
The film, which was released in 2003, was a critical success, but did more for Green than simply launching her career. ‘Bertolucci gave me faith in myself. He was like a little angel.’ After seeing her performance, Jobert agreed that she had made the right decision; but the rest of Green’s family found the film’s explicit intimacy shocking. ‘When you are not in the business and you see something so sexual, it is too brutal. I mean, it was horrific for me when I saw it. But I hate watching myself anyway.’
She hated the ancillary elements of being an actor, too, not least the red carpet. ‘I remember my first time. The Dreamers was about to come out. It was an Armani event, and [Martin] Scorsese was at my table. I said to my agent, “I can’t go, I have nothing to tell him!” But then [Giorgio] Armani took me aside and said, ‘We are going to do the red carpet!’
Green still doesn’t enjoy ritzy events, which she says is down to a lack of confidence. ‘I am very shy. It is a handicap. I am never good when there are lots of people. It is a thing from my childhood, I can’t even explain why.’
It is something that she has learnt to deal with, though, by taking herself off to the loo to do breathing exercises to calm herself, and wearing elaborate gowns (her favourite designer is Alexander McQueen) and melodramatic make-up as a kind of armour. ‘It protects me. Because otherwise it is very violent for me,’ she says. ‘I just wish sometimes that we didn’t have to talk, that we were just silent movie stars.’
And here is the conundrum, one that Green herself has said she does not quite understand: why someone so shy (although, one-on-one, drily funny, thoughtful and open) would do a job that is so emotionally exposing, both on screen and off it.
In a 2017 radio interview, Green’s mother revealed that Harvey Weinstein had attempted to physically assault her daughter when she was a young actor in a hotel room in Paris. ‘She managed to escape, but he threatened to destroy her professionally,’ said Jobert. Green has never been keen to go into details about the event, but she is happy to say how relieved she is that Weinstein has been sentenced to 23 years in prison. ‘I am grateful that justice has been served. I praise the brave women who risked so much in coming forward, not only their careers and reputations, but the pain that they have suffered in having to relive being raped in order to put this sexual predator out of harm’s way. Their courage has changed the world.’
This change is something that Green is living through – on the Friday before we meet, she attended the French César awards where Roman Polanski, who pleaded guilty to unlawful sex with a minor in the US in 1977 but fled before sentence was passed (and with whom Green made the film Based on a True Story in 2017), was given the award for best director in absentia, resulting in many of the members of the audience walking out.
‘It was so tense,’ said Green. ‘I have never been in a situation like that before.’ She is enjoying the shift in the power dynamic in the film industry, working with female directors like Alice Winocour, making female-centric stories, like that of the astronaut Sarah, where there is not even a whiff of romance. ‘It is good, and there is still more to do,’ she says. ‘It is so radical – for men it is very hard, they take so many hits. There are very good men.’
One of the best men, as far as Green is concerned, is director Tim Burton, with whom she has collaborated on three films, most recently last year’s Dumbo. There have been rumours of romance between Green and Burton, who has two children with his former partner, actor Helena Bonham Carter, but Green has always denied this, maintaining that their relationship is purely professional. ‘My dream as a child, and later on, was always to work with him. I love his world. He is such a nice person as well.’
Green says she does not have a partner at the moment – her main companion is her miniature schnauzer, Winston. ‘Winston is so clever; very serious, very sensitive. I can’t lie to him,’ she says, showing me a picture of him, looking serious and sensitive in a tartan bow tie. ‘This is how I dress him.’
Green has lived in London since her early 20s, when she got a British agent and promptly moved into their spare bedroom in Primrose Hill. She loves London, but her circle is international – her sister, Joy, lives in Italy, on a vineyard with her Italian count husband and two children. ‘She is very different [to me], very down to earth. We are so different that it might have been a bit tense in the past, but we really get on now.’
When asked to elaborate on these sibling differences, Green considers, before saying, ‘Maybe I am a bit weird? If I mentioned tarot, things like this, she would go, “You are crazy.” So I don’t talk about any of that.’
Green became interested in tarot in 2014 when she was filming the Showtime series Penny Dreadful, a drama set in the Victorian occult underworld starring Josh Hartnett and Billie Piper. Green was nominated for a Golden Globe for her portrayal of Vanessa Ives, a young woman prone to satanic visions and demonic possessions.
‘If it [tarot] is done properly, it teaches you things about yourself. It is fast-forward therapy.’ She does not go to normal therapy, although she did a little when she was younger. ‘But if you have a few tools, you can become very connected.’
Her toolbox includes regular meditation. ‘I am very into this guru at the moment, Teal Swan, who lives in Costa Rica. She does guided meditations that really calm you.’ She also exercises every morning for 45 minutes, sometimes with a trainer, and uses the Wim Hof cold-water-therapy technique, which involves a daily 10-minute cold shower. ‘It is all about the breathing and helps you when you are stressed. It makes you get rid of all that s—t.’
These techniques are a proactive way of managing anxiety. But Green also likes a glass of red wine in the evening (‘Of course. I’m French. I have been doing that every day of my life since I was 18’), going for long walks, taking photographs, and compiling collages of black-and-white images.
She is not on social media – ‘it is very narcissistic and not in a great way’ – and her greatest pleasure is travel: trips to places like Namibia and Bhutan, long walking holidays, often alone. ‘The first day is always quite scary, but then you connect much better with your surroundings, with people as well. Your senses are more awakened.’
The opportunity to travel was just one of the reasons Green accepted a role in the upcoming adaptation of Eleanor Catton’s The Luminaries. Set in the 1860s during the New Zealand gold rush, the BBC Two series stars Eve Hewson, the actor daughter of Bono, while Green plays scheming brothel-keeper Lydia Wells. ‘I love characters like that. You think she is one thing and then you discover that she is something else. Of course she is manipulative, but she is not a baddie. She is a very strong woman.’
Lydia is also an astrologer, another of Green’s interests. ‘I am completely into that stuff.’ Her star sign is cancer, and in July she will turn 40, although there will not be a party. ‘I am not a birthday girl at all. I always want everyone else to feel so good that I cannot relax.’ The fact that it is a landmark birthday is adding to Green’s feeling of unease. We talk about how age brings maturity, wisdom and a sense of acceptance about who we are.
‘That’s true. And then there’s the immediate thing of, “I’m going to get old, what did I achieve, are people still going to desire me?” Especially as an actor, I think, because I’ve always heard that when you reach 40, it is going to be difficult to get roles. What about as a woman: can you still be attractive, do you have children? If you don’t have children, are you kind of a social failure? These are clichés, but people say, “You don’t have children?” and you feel like not a woman when you say, “No, I don’t have them.” It is hard… But then, I feel like I am 12 still and now I am about to be 40. What happened there?’
And yet, she does have a plan… ‘I want to get a farm. I know it sounds like a whim, but it is something that I have been thinking about a lot. Maybe Wales, I love Wales. The scenery is amazing. Sitting in the city, it is choking me sometimes, and there is nothing better than to connect with nature. You feel whole.’
Source: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/life/eva-green-coping-crippling-anxiety-shyi-wish-silent-movie-sta
submitted by aranbee to EvaGreen [link] [comments]

Ursula Andress for FN Inspo

As an FN, I was originally really put off by the everyday girl-next-door descriptions of the Natural types, because they sounded so bland compared to the other archetypes. But when I was doing a Kibbe exercise and thinking of Old Hollywood celebrities that I could relate to, Ursula Andress came to mind, and I realized that she was pretty much a textbook FN. (I don't think she's verified, but what else could she be? I thought she was much taller, but apparently, she's only 5'5'')
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/60/50/d6/6050d610cf7d623715447ee7ad0acb01.jpg
https://starschanges.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Ursula-Andress-height-weight-age.jpg
If you don't know, one of her most iconic roles was as Honey Rider in the Bond movie Dr. No. She actually played two different Bond Girls, her second role being Vesper Lynd in the og Casino Royale. When I think of Bond Girls, boring is the last thing that comes to mind.
https://youtu.be/H2hC8Frhicg
This post was actually inspired by a video of her talking about why she thinks Honey Rider was such a memorable role. She talks about the perceived difference between voluptuous actresses like Marilyn Monroe and how her impact on screen could be traced to her athletic presence, which was a novelty at the time. (That's the gist of it, but you really should watch that part of the video because I think she does a good job of explaining the difference between presences.)
I've noticed that she often dressed in a way that respected her lines (though maybe this is just selection bias). There is an emphasis on length, angles, and the T-shape that defines FNs. She also makes some crossover in SD silhouettes, but I think she pulls it off because of her vertical line and her waistline, which is very small but doesn't necessarily have to be emphasized.
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/4f/5f/f9/4f5ff987021dbb9e6b2d5c7da5784263.jpg (a casual look with shoulder emphasis that I think would be good for all Naturals)
https://i.pinimg.com/236x/8a/c0/e6/8ac0e6d830643f59aaea1933b5286f04--leopard-coat-ursula-andress.jpg (an oversized leopard print coat is supported by her strong shoulder line)
https://wwreview.piwigo.com/_datas/3/v/p/3vpqqekc90/i/uploads/3/v/p/3vpqqekc90//2018/04/30/20180430190851-988c4195-la.jpg (sharp angles of neckline and hem, space in sleeves to accommodate T-shape)
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/de/c1/c5/dec1c57f2a3a04ae23664c4f56fdd877.jpg (notice how there is waist emphasis but also length in the top... also just a fun outfit lol)
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/eb/07/dc/eb07dcc60e3878e5de3d08cc097bebc4.jpg (this one uses FN draping to express glamour usually associated with the SD archetype)
https://m.blog.hu/fi/filmvilag/image/portr%C3%A9/ursula%20andress1.JPG (natural draping with heavier fabrics)
I noticed that she wore lots of dresses with waist emphasis, but if you look closely, the vertical line is the most important part of these looks. If you cover the waist area with your finger, many of these looks resemble the blouson dresses that are stereotypical FN recommendations.
https://iconicimages.net/app/uploads/2017/01/UA010.jpg
https://i.pinimg.com/236x/58/f6/9c/58f69c9f70c5293734ff9e8bfe941336--ursula-andress-art-movies.jpg
https://celebbodystats.com/uploads/2020/01/23/ursula-andress-measurements-15797902015e29af79ba91c9.61449661.jpg
https://i.pinimg.com/550x/d2/c2/d0/d2c2d0ed4a4a1528767dcde042bdb259.jpg
I made this post because, while I've read on this forum that any type can be cute, sexy, etc., it's difficult to separate the lines of a type from the archetype that was given to them in Metamorphosis. And the Natural category sometimes feels like it's just a place to stick all the leftovers, but it can be all these things and more.
I end with this quote from Ursula herself: "I don't use my body to seduce, no. I just stand there."
submitted by silverhymn to Kibbe [link] [comments]

What's happening around town (Wed, Dec 4th - Tue, Dec 10th)

Oklahoma City's event list.

Wednesday, Dec 4th

Thursday, Dec 5th

  • 🎓 5th Annual Red Earth Treefest (Red Earth Art Center - Oklahoma City) 1 day left Start Time: 9:00am Red Earth Art Center has partnered with OSU-OKC to celebrate the holiday season with a distinctive Native flair. Purchase beautiful handmade Christmas…
  • 2019 Lights from the Heart (Heart of Oklahoma Chamber of Commerce - Purcell) 1 day left Start Time: 5:30pm Drive around Purcell City Lake and create holiday memories as you see over 190 animated displays featuring over 650,000 lights! There is no admission fee,…
  • 🎭 Arcadia (Oklahoma City University - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 8:00pm Join us December 5-8, 2020 in Burg Theatre for our Mainstage production of ARCADIA by Tom Stoppard. ARCADIA moves back and forth between 1809 and the…
  • Art Show at DNA Galleries (Plaza District - Oklahoma City) Thru Sun, Dec 8th Start Time: 6:00pm
  • 🏃 Christmas in the Park 2019 (Yukon City Park - Yukon) 1 day left Start Time: 6:00pm It’s time for Yukon’s breathtaking Christmas in the Park, a magical wonderland of visual entertainment offered starting The Saturday before…
  • Christmas on the Western Frontier (Downtown - El Reno) Christmas on the Western Frontier features an old-fashioned Christmas parade with more than 50 floats, along with evening…
  • Shawnee Christmas Parade of Lights (Downtown - Shawnee) Enjoy one of Oklahoma's largest nighttime Christmas parades and watch as Main Street comes alive with lights. The…
  • The Christmas Show (Civic Center Music Hall - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Dec 7th The Oklahoma City Philharmonic presents its annual holiday performance "The Christmas Show." This show is a family…
  • 🎓 Defeating Stereotypes: Beloved Community (Norman Public Library - Norman) Start Time: 6:30pm Join us at Norman East to engage in dialogue about inclusivity and diversity. This will be the first event in a speaker series that will consist of…
  • Edmond Electric's Luminance 2019 (Mitch Park - Edmond) 1 day left Start Time: 5:00pm The Second Annual Luminance is the a walk-thru holiday light display that will be open to the public from November 23 - January 5. This year, there will be…
  • Grace Babb, Maddie Razook, Lacey Elaine (The Blue Door - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 8:00pm
  • Holiday Happening (Sam Noble Museum - Norman) Start Time: 4:00pm Get in the holiday spirit with cookie decorating, pictures with Santa, games, winter crafts and a blizzard of fun! This FREE, annual event features craft…
  • 🎨 Holiday Lights Spectacular (Midwest City) 1 day left Start Time: 6:00pm Experience Midwest City's holiday lights display all holiday season long at Joe B. Barnes Regional Park! This display is open each night from Nov. 22 to…
  • The Holiday Wrap-Up! (ACM @ UCO - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 7:00pm A faculty and student showcase benefitting Oklahoma City nonprofit Positive Tomorrows. Admission is free with any cash or clothing donation!
  • Home for the Holidays (Kirkpatrick Auditorium - Oklahoma City) Thru Sun, Dec 8th Get in the rhythm of the holidays with a Broadway-style dance extravaganza at Oklahoma City University. Come marvel at…
  • Home for the Holidays (Downtown - Tuttle) Visit downtown Tuttle this December and get in the Christmas spirit with Home for the Holidays. This free, family-friendly…
  • ISACA Central Oklahoma December Luncheon (Whiskey Cake - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 11:30am Speaker: Brance Spradlin from CyberArk
    Topic: TBD
    Location: Whiskey Cake Starter: FARM SALAD- House greens, cucumber, carrot, grape tomatoes, shaved…
  • Jake's Jingle Jam (Riverwind Casino - Norman) Start Time: 7:00pm Head to Riverwind Casino in Norman for Jake's Jingle Jam. Featuring Jon Langston, Stephanie Quayle and LOCASH, guests…
  • Jane Austen's Christmas Cracker (Paseo - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Dec 21st Celebrate the holiday season with Jane Austen's most beloved characters as Shakespeare on the Paseo presents: Jane…
  • Chickasha Main Street Christmas Parade (Rock Island Depot - Chickasha) The 2019 Christmas magic holiday parade features marching bands, floats, antique cars, horses and more. Come to the…
  • Nile in Concert (89th Street Collective - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 7:00pm Take the chance to see legendarty metal band Nile live as they route their tour through Oklahoma City. Best-known for their…
  • NRHA Futurity & Adequan Championship Show (Oklahoma State Fair Park - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Dec 7th The National Reining Horse Association (NRHA), with its international headquarters in Oklahoma City, presents one of the…
  • 🎨 The Pop-Up Shop at The Department Store (University of Central Oklahoma - Edmond) Start Time: 1:00pm
  • Norman, OK - Push On Tour w/ UBI (The Deli - Norman) Start Time: 9:00pm Push On Tour w/ UBI Featuring Strange Music artist(s) UBI! General Admission Tickets - https://strangemusicinc.net/links/ticket/2985
    Ages - 21+ Doors Open…
  • Territorial Christmas Celebration (Harn Homestead Museum - Oklahoma City) Experience the wonder of a truly old-fashioned Christmas at the Territorial Christmas Celebration at the Harn Homestead…
  • 🎓 There’s No Business Like Snow Business (UCO Jazz Lab - Edmond) Start Time: 7:30pm Sure to get you in the holiday spirit, come join in on a festivity-filled evening of your favorite holiday tunes performed by some of Central’s finest…
  • 😂 Triple Feature Week OKC!!! (Loony Bin Comedy Club - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Dec 7th
  • WAX-Push On Tour w/ UBI of Ces Cru / Lance Skiiiwalker (The Deli - Norman) Start Time: 10:00pm Headliner: WAX UBI of Ces Cru Co-Headliner: Lance Skiiiwalker
  • Wild Bird Holiday Decorations (Myriad Botanical Gardens - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 6:00pm Thursday, December 5, 6-7pm Member $8; Nonmember $10 Best for ages 6 to 10 REGISTER HERE Learn about the best ways we can help birds during winter while we…

Friday, Dec 6th

  • 🎓 5th Annual Red Earth Treefest (Red Earth Art Center - Oklahoma City) Last Day Start Time: 9:00am Red Earth Art Center has partnered with OSU-OKC to celebrate the holiday season with a distinctive Native flair. Purchase beautiful handmade Christmas…
  • 2019 Lights from the Heart (Heart of Oklahoma Chamber of Commerce - Purcell) Last Day Start Time: 5:30pm Drive around Purcell City Lake and create holiday memories as you see over 190 animated displays featuring over 650,000 lights! There is no admission fee,…
  • All State Second Round (Westmoore High School - Oklahoma City) Day 1 of 2
  • Art Show at DNA Galleries (Plaza District - Oklahoma City) Thru Sun, Dec 8th Start Time: 6:00pm
  • Boys Ranch Town Drive-Thru Christmas Pageant (Edmond) Thru Sun, Dec 8th The Boys Ranch Town Drive-Thru Christmas Pageant has been an annual gift from Boys Ranch Town to the community and visitors…
  • 🏃 Christmas in the Park 2019 (Yukon City Park - Yukon) Last Day Start Time: 6:00pm It’s time for Yukon’s breathtaking Christmas in the Park, a magical wonderland of visual entertainment offered starting The Saturday before…
  • The Christmas Show (Civic Center Music Hall - Oklahoma City) 1 day left The Oklahoma City Philharmonic presents its annual holiday performance "The Christmas Show." This show is a family…
  • Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony (Del City Community Center - Del City) Start Time: 6:00pm Mayor's Christmas Tree lighting -More information to come
  • Christmas Vespers (Oklahoma City First Presbyterian Church - Oklahoma City) Day 1 of 2 Christmas Vespers, performed by the Oklahoma City University Choir and Symphony Orchestra, will feature more than 200…
  • DelQuest Committee Meeting (Don's Alley - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 8:00am
  • A Down Home Christmas: Presented by A Gypsy & A Cowgirl (Firelake Arena - Shawnee) Start Time: 6:00pm Shop before Christmas! Vintage items, repurposed, antiques, hand crafted, specialty boutique items and more! VIP Night - December 6th $10 entry Live music…
  • Edmond Electric's Luminance 2019 (Mitch Park - Edmond) Last Day Start Time: 5:00pm The Second Annual Luminance is the a walk-thru holiday light display that will be open to the public from November 23 - January 5. This year, there will be…
  • Firehouse Arts Center Holiday Gift Gallery (Firehouse Arts Center - Norman) Start Time: 6:00pm
  • First Friday Gallery Walk (Paseo Arts District - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 6:00pm The First Friday Gallery Walk in the Paseo Arts District occurs on the first Friday of every month. Friday night visitors…
  • 🎓 Free Zumba (Guthrie Library - Guthrie) Start Time: 5:00pm Dress to sweat! Free Latin inspired dance fitness class. Space is Limited. RSVP. The City of Guthrie, OK - Municipal Government Guthrie, Oklahoma…
  • Gingerbread House Gala (Norman Public Library - Norman) Start Time: 6:00pm All ages are invited to decorate a gingerbread house and get into the joy of the season with the Purcell Public Library! The tradition of decorating…
  • 🎓 Holiday Customer Appreciation Celebration (U.S. Cellular - Chickasha) Start Time: 10:00am Chickasha U.S. Cellular Store Hosting Holiday Customer Appreciation Celebration
    Happy holidays from U.S. Cellular! The Chickasha store at 1714 S 1st St. is…
  • 🎓 Holiday Customer Appreciation Celebration (U.S. Cellular - Moore) Start Time: 10:00am Moore U.S. Cellular Store Hosting Holiday Customer Appreciation Celebration
    Happy holidays from U.S. Cellular! The Moore store at 705 SW 19th Street is…
  • 🎓 Holiday Customer Appreciation Celebration (U.S. Cellular - Norman) Start Time: 10:00am Norman U.S. Cellular Store Hosting Holiday Customer Appreciation Celebration
    Happy holidays from U.S. Cellular! The Norman store at 1411 24th Ave. NW…
  • 🎨 Holiday Lights Spectacular (Midwest City) Last Day Start Time: 6:00pm Experience Midwest City's holiday lights display all holiday season long at Joe B. Barnes Regional Park! This display is open each night from Nov. 22 to…
  • 🎓 Holiday Scam Prevention Forum (Rose State College - Midwest City) Start Time: 12:00pm Cyber security is always a concern, but even more so around the holidays. Frauds and scams happen roughly every 40 seconds in the US, affecting millions of…
  • Home for the Holidays (Kirkpatrick Auditorium - Oklahoma City) Thru Sun, Dec 8th Get in the rhythm of the holidays with a Broadway-style dance extravaganza at Oklahoma City University. Come marvel at…
  • 🎓 Hosting Holiday Customer Appreciation Celebration (U.S. Cellular on Rockwell - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 10:00am Oklahoma City U.S. Cellular Store Hosting Holiday Customer Appreciation Celebration
    Happy holidays from U.S. Cellular! The Oklahoma City store at 7000 NW…
  • Jane Austen's Christmas Cracker (Paseo - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Dec 21st Celebrate the holiday season with Jane Austen's most beloved characters as Shakespeare on the Paseo presents: Jane…
  • John Fullbright in Concert (The Blue Door - Oklahoma City) Day 1 of 2 Widely-regarded Red Dirt musician John Fullbright is returning to his home state for a concert at The Blue Door in…
  • Mantels & Trees Holiday Home Tour (Miller - Oklahoma City) Embark on the annual Mantels & Trees Tour in Oklahoma City's Miller neighborhood, and pick up festive holiday…
  • NRHA Futurity & Adequan Championship Show (Oklahoma State Fair Park - Oklahoma City) 1 day left The National Reining Horse Association (NRHA), with its international headquarters in Oklahoma City, presents one of the…
  • Skirvin Jazz Club (Skirvin Hilton - Oklahoma City) The Skirvin Hilton transforms into the Skirvin Jazz Club on Friday nights. Guests are invited to attend this immersive live…
  • Storyland Christmas (Charles J. Johnson Central Park - Midwest City) Start Time: 6:00pm
  • Travis Tritt in Concert (Riverwind Casino - Norman) Acclaimed country singer Travis Tritt is headed to Norman's Riverwind Casino for a show that is not to be missed. The…
  • 😂 Triple Feature Week OKC!!! (Loony Bin Comedy Club - Oklahoma City) 1 day left
  • 🎓 UCO Musical Theatre Shadow Day (University of Central Oklahoma - Edmond) Start Time: 9:30am Take an inside look at our UCO Musical Theatre program. Meet current faculty and students, tour the UCO campus, and audition to be part of the incoming…
  • UCO WinterGlow (Nigh University Center - Edmond) Bring the entire family out to UCO WinterGlow in Edmond for an evening of holiday festivities. The event kicks off at 6pm…
  • Vintage Market Days (Oklahoma State Fair Park - Oklahoma City) Thru Sun, Dec 8th Vintage Market Days is an upscale open-air market scheduled to pop-up in various parts of the state four to five times a…

Saturday, Dec 7th

  • All State Second Round (Westmoore High School - Oklahoma City) Day 2 of 2
  • Art Show at DNA Galleries (Plaza District - Oklahoma City) 1 day left Start Time: 6:00pm
  • Oklahoma City Blue vs Stockton Kings (Cox Convention Center - Oklahoma City) Come see some thrilling professional basketball during the Oklahoma City Blue 2019-20 season. Experience the fast-paced…
  • Boys Ranch Town Drive-Thru Christmas Pageant (Edmond) 1 day left The Boys Ranch Town Drive-Thru Christmas Pageant has been an annual gift from Boys Ranch Town to the community and visitors…
  • Breakfast with Santa (Orr Family Farm Event Barn - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Dec 14th Wake up the kids and don't miss Breakfast with Santa this December. Join Orr Family Farm Event Barn in Oklahoma…
  • Mustang Christmas Bazaar (Mustang) The Mustang Christmas Bazaar has everything you need to get in the holiday spirit. Browse over 50 vendors featuring numerous…
  • The Christmas Show (Civic Center Music Hall - Oklahoma City) Last Day The Oklahoma City Philharmonic presents its annual holiday performance "The Christmas Show." This show is a family…
  • Christmas Vespers (Oklahoma City First Presbyterian Church - Oklahoma City) Day 2 of 2 Christmas Vespers, performed by the Oklahoma City University Choir and Symphony Orchestra, will feature more than 200…
  • Colt Ford in Concert (Diamond Ballroom - Oklahoma City) Don't miss country-rap artist Colt Ford live in concert at the Diamond Ballroom. This Academy of Country Music…
  • Cowboy Christmas Parade (Stockyards City - Oklahoma City) Saddle up and ride into Historic Stockyards City this holiday season for the annual Cowboy Christmas Celebration. The first…
  • Creative Christmas Craft Show (Cleveland County Fairgrounds - Norman) Bring your list and check it twice at the Creative Christmas Craft Show in Norman. Held within the Cleveland County…
  • Holiday Hop (Edmond Historical Society - Edmond) Don't miss out on the annual Holiday Hop in Edmond, a free family event hosted by the Edmond Historical Society Museum.…
  • 🏃 Holiday Hustle 5K/10K (Oklahoma Christian University, Edmond, OK - Edmond) Annual Holiday Hustle 5k \-USATF certified 5k and 10k courses \-flat and FAST \-prize money to top 3 male and female \-pancake breakfast…
  • Holiday Shopping Cocoa Crawl (Plaza District - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 2:00pm Join us for our second annual Plaza District "Cocoa Crawl". Shop Local. Support Small Business. Drink Yummy Cocoa. It's that easy!
    Shops throughout the…
  • Holly Jolly Shops (Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark - Oklahoma City) Day 1 of 2 Come enjoy holiday shopping in a festive atmosphere at the Holly Jolly Shops inside the Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark. This…
  • Home for the Holidays (Kirkpatrick Auditorium - Oklahoma City) 1 day left Get in the rhythm of the holidays with a Broadway-style dance extravaganza at Oklahoma City University. Come marvel at…
  • Minco Honey Festival (Minco High School - Minco) Satisfy your sweet tooth at the Minco Honey Festival with pure Oklahoma honey. During this celebration of…
  • Jane Austen's Christmas Cracker (Paseo - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Dec 21st Celebrate the holiday season with Jane Austen's most beloved characters as Shakespeare on the Paseo presents: Jane…
  • John Fullbright in Concert (The Blue Door - Oklahoma City) Day 2 of 2 Widely-regarded Red Dirt musician John Fullbright is returning to his home state for a concert at The Blue Door in…
  • Lighted Christmas Parade & Fireworks (Downtown - Kingfisher) Bundle up, grab your camera and get into the holiday spirit this December with the annual Lighted Christmas Parade and…
  • 🏃 Little Willie's Triple Dog Dare (Leadership Square - Oklahoma City) Little Willie's Triple Dog Dare is the Ultimate Stair Climb competition in OKC. Competitors will climb and descend both North and South Towers of Leadership…
  • Guthrie Maker Days (Guthrie Art Center - Guthrie) During Guthrie Maker Days, all are invited to engage with their inner creative side. Once a month, participate in the…
  • NRHA Futurity & Adequan Championship Show (Oklahoma State Fair Park - Oklahoma City) Last Day The National Reining Horse Association (NRHA), with its international headquarters in Oklahoma City, presents one of the…
  • OU Sooners vs LSU Tigers (The Lloyd Noble Center - Norman) Head to Norman to watch as the Oklahoma Sooners Women's Basketball take on the LSU Tigers. Since the team's…
  • 🏃 POOP Trail Run (Lake Thunderbird State Park - Norman) POOP (Protect Our Oklahoma Parks) Trail Run is a trail event on the first Saturday of December at the Clear Bay Trails of Lake Thunderbird State Park.
    All…
  • Tacky Sweater 5K (Chandler Park - Purcell) Head to Chandler Park in Purcell for the Tacky Sweater 5K, whether ready to run or leisurely admire the Christmas lights…
  • Oklahoma City Train Show (Oklahoma State Fair Park - Oklahoma City) Day 1 of 2 The Oklahoma City Train Show is one of the largest model train shows in the region with operating model train displays,…
  • 😂 Triple Feature Week OKC!!! (Loony Bin Comedy Club - Oklahoma City) Last Day
  • Victorian Homes Tour (Historic Guthrie - Guthrie) Thru Sat, Dec 14th Enjoy an exclusive look inside some of Guthrie’s most distinctive homes and historic buildings, decorated for the…
  • Vintage Market Days (Oklahoma State Fair Park - Oklahoma City) 1 day left Vintage Market Days is an upscale open-air market scheduled to pop-up in various parts of the state four to five times a…
  • Winterfest Craft Show (Kingfisher County Fairgrounds - Kingfisher) Perfect for holiday shopping, the Winterfest Craft Show in Kingfisher features over 65 booths of gifts, crafts and home…

Sunday, Dec 8th

  • Art Show at DNA Galleries (Plaza District - Oklahoma City) Last Day Start Time: 6:00pm
  • Oklahoma City Blue vs Texas Legends (Cox Convention Center - Oklahoma City) Come see some thrilling professional basketball during the Oklahoma City Blue 2019-20 season. Experience the fast-paced…
  • Boys Ranch Town Drive-Thru Christmas Pageant (Edmond) Last Day The Boys Ranch Town Drive-Thru Christmas Pageant has been an annual gift from Boys Ranch Town to the community and visitors…
  • Breakfast with Santa (Orr Family Farm Event Barn - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Dec 14th Wake up the kids and don't miss Breakfast with Santa this December. Join Orr Family Farm Event Barn in Oklahoma…
  • Candy Cane Christmas Concert (American Banjo Museum - Oklahoma City) The American Banjo Museum will transform into a winter wonderland for the festive Candy Cane Christmas Concert. Head to this…
  • Fort Reno Christmas Guns (Historic Fort Reno - El Reno) Quite literally a blast from the past, Fort Reno Christmas Guns is a tradition brought here by German immigrants. The…
  • Handel's Messiah (Civic Center Music Hall - Oklahoma City) Celebrate the season with a performance of Handel's "Messiah" by Canterbury Voices at Oklahoma City's…
  • Holly Jolly Shops (Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark - Oklahoma City) Day 2 of 2 Come enjoy holiday shopping in a festive atmosphere at the Holly Jolly Shops inside the Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark. This…
  • Home for the Holidays (Kirkpatrick Auditorium - Oklahoma City) Last Day Get in the rhythm of the holidays with a Broadway-style dance extravaganza at Oklahoma City University. Come marvel at…
  • Jane Austen's Christmas Cracker (Paseo - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Dec 21st Celebrate the holiday season with Jane Austen's most beloved characters as Shakespeare on the Paseo presents: Jane…
  • Round Barn Rendezvous (Arcadia Round Barn - Arcadia) Come by this iconic Route 66 stop as local artists fill the Round Barn in Arcadia with the sound of acoustic music once…
  • Oklahoma City Train Show (Oklahoma State Fair Park - Oklahoma City) Day 2 of 2 The Oklahoma City Train Show is one of the largest model train shows in the region with operating model train displays,…
  • Trans-Siberian Orchestra in Concert (Chesapeake Energy Arena - Oklahoma City) Visit Oklahoma City's Chesapeake Energy Arena this December for the Trans-Siberian Orchestra's highly acclaimed rock…
  • Victorian Homes Tour (Historic Guthrie - Guthrie) Thru Sat, Dec 14th Enjoy an exclusive look inside some of Guthrie’s most distinctive homes and historic buildings, decorated for the…
  • Vintage Market Days (Oklahoma State Fair Park - Oklahoma City) Last Day Vintage Market Days is an upscale open-air market scheduled to pop-up in various parts of the state four to five times a…

Monday, Dec 9th

  • Breakfast with Santa (Orr Family Farm Event Barn - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Dec 14th Wake up the kids and don't miss Breakfast with Santa this December. Join Orr Family Farm Event Barn in Oklahoma…
  • Jane Austen's Christmas Cracker (Paseo - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Dec 21st Celebrate the holiday season with Jane Austen's most beloved characters as Shakespeare on the Paseo presents: Jane…
  • Victorian Homes Tour (Historic Guthrie - Guthrie) Thru Sat, Dec 14th Enjoy an exclusive look inside some of Guthrie’s most distinctive homes and historic buildings, decorated for the…

Tuesday, Dec 10th

  • Breakfast with Santa (Orr Family Farm Event Barn - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Dec 14th Wake up the kids and don't miss Breakfast with Santa this December. Join Orr Family Farm Event Barn in Oklahoma…
  • Oklahoma City Futurity (Oklahoma State Fair Park - Oklahoma City) Thru Sun, Dec 15th Better Barrel Races presents the Oklahoma City Futurity at Oklahoma State Fair Park. This equestrian event will feature…
  • Jane Austen's Christmas Cracker (Paseo - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Dec 21st Celebrate the holiday season with Jane Austen's most beloved characters as Shakespeare on the Paseo presents: Jane…
  • Tinsel, Tunes & Trivia (Poteet Theatre at Luke’s United Methodist Church - Oklahoma City) The OK City Chorus presents a Christmas celebration you won't want to miss at Tinsel, Tunes & Trivia this December.…
  • Victorian Homes Tour (Historic Guthrie - Guthrie) Thru Sat, Dec 14th Enjoy an exclusive look inside some of Guthrie’s most distinctive homes and historic buildings, decorated for the…

See Also

submitted by eventbot to okc [link] [comments]

What makes a good James Bond girl.

There are lots of elements that make for a good James Bond film.
The actor, the plot, the villain, and the girl are all parts of what makes a good James Bond.
I'd like to discuss the girl's part.
In my mind, Tracy Draco-Bond and Vesper Lynd are the best James Bond girls followed closely by Anya Amasova while Christmas Jones, Mary Goodnight or Tiffany case are part of the worst girls.
So what makes for me a great James Bond girl?
Intelligence and wits. The James Bond girl needs to be able to respond to James on an even ground of witty repartees, I remember the train scene in Casino Royale as a prime exemple of this.
Some level of independancy and resource. Tracy has her great car chase where Bond is suppporting her, then she gets her own fight scene waay before Waï Lin in TND. Anya is the equivalent of a 00 in Russia.
Beauty and sex appeal but not so overtly, good James Bond girls are not running around in mini-shorts (yes, I look at you Christmas!), they are classy, look at tracy in her white cocktail dress and Vesper in her black one!
They have character development and frailties. Tracy is suicidal at the start of On her majesty's secret service, Vesper cracks down after participating on the murder of an enemy and has lots of secrets, while Mary Goodnight is just here for the sake of being here, and poor Tiffany is only making mistakes.
And you, what are tour defining qualities for a great james Bond girl, one you will remember forever?
submitted by mogwenb to JamesBond [link] [comments]

Quantum of Solace is the best Bond movie.

"when the Quantum of Solace drops to zero, humanity and consideration of one human for another is gone."
-Ian Fleming
Normally when comparing Bond movies you can almost create a cross table and check how each movie performed the same trope. But not Quantum of Solace. Quantum of Solace throws the whole Bond formula straight out of the window and stands alone in being the only movie where James Bond shows actual character development.
There's something infantile about seeing Bond dress up and perform the same repeated crowd-pleasing tricks like a well trained monkey. QoS treats its audience like its mature enough to at least remember the events of Casino Royale and the effects it has had on Bond being a human character.
It's the only Bond movie in existence that continues directly where the previous one left off. Bond deals with Mr.White at Lake Como and immediately the sequel takes off with a car chase around the lake.
And it doesn't just stick to that continuation as a gimmick. Everything about Casino Royale reverberates into this movie. Rather than starting from a blank slate repeating the formula over 23 times. Bond is now shaken and stirred because of his loss of Vesper.
The man is a complete wreck. Sure the plot of him goinga gainst MI6 has been done several times. But this time Bond is completely unhinged. From start right up till the end we see a seething man who has lost everything while being extremely competent and dangerous when he puts his mind to what he wants.
One of the main criticism is the shaky cam. Which would be valid criticism if Bond were a Kung Fu movie but it isn't. It's a spy thriller and like most modern violence it's fast, hectic and over before we truly grasped what just happened. The camera was a deliberate style choice. It gave us one of the best scenes in Bond history. The utterly hectic Opera Scene
The stakes were grounded and muted. Some phony environmental philantrophist receiving an award while at the same time holding the Bolivian government over a barrel by depriving the people of water, all for a better contract. It was perfect for the story QoS needed to tell. Greene was just another oligarch playing geo-political cynical games making millions suffer in the process. He wasn't some psychopath that needed to provoke a war, nuke a city or blow up the moon with a giant laser. More so, he turns out to be just a puppet way in over his head and ends up being devoured by the regime he schemed aroudn with.
Special praise to both 'Bond girls' who finally served an actual purpose in the story. Being each other's opposites, a naive school teacher who Bond can easily manipulate in fulfilling his immediate needs (and with her paying the ultimate price for it) and Montest who, just like Bond is completely jaded and purely driven by revenge. Both looking for that intangible solace.
And that's how the movie ends. The solace remains out of reach. Montes was able to get her revenge. Bond was able to not only kill the man responsible for Vesper's death and rescue a girl just like Vesper from falling to the same fate, and neither one of them is able to feel any closure or resolution. When both discuss their revenge and their further plans Montest remarks "let me know how it feels" leaving two damaged people who despite being bereft of their fairy tale ending, have found a way to make their suffering theirs and use it for the better.
submitted by Thefriendlyfaceplant to unpopularopinion [link] [comments]

Do all the films follow the books as closely as Casino Royale?

Hello all, I've only read one James Bond book, and it is Casino Royale. After reading I immediately watched the movie and I was totally surprised at how accurate the film was to the book. Lots of action was added, and the plot was generally modernized, but some tiny details were retained that genuinely surprised me.
Vesper's first dress, the man with the eyepatch, Le Chiffre's inhaler, "the job is done, the bitch is dead" and so much more. There were even quotes from Casino Royale the book in Quantum of Solace. Chunks of monologue were retained. It was impressive!
I have the remaining books en route to my house now, so it'll be a few days before I can read them, so I'm watching all the films again and I'm wondering, are they all this faithful?
I was thrilled when I recognized quotes or outfits or characters from the book in the movie, I'm hoping the rest are the same!
submitted by JackalopeRider to JamesBond [link] [comments]

How to look like Pierce Brosnan – The hottest James Bond

Pierce Brosnan is one of my favorite actors of all time. In my mind, 90s Pierce Brosnan is straight up the definition of cool. I was hopelessly in love with every single character he played from the late 80s to maybe 2005. After all, who else do you call when there’s a North Korean with a sky laser? Who else steals paintings out of the Met just for fun? Who else can make Christmas come more than once a year? There's no linguist more cunning than him, and if he stole my girlfriend, I’d high-five her for pulling guys that hot.

In fact, if I were to look at all the James Bonds and pick out the one that looks the best from a modern point of view, I’d definitely pick Pierce Brosnan. Sean Connery is dressed very conservatively, in a classic British civil servant style, and if you emulated him today, you would be seen as a bit stuffy, and a bit out of touch. Roger Moore dressed in a very dandy, playboyish 78s style, the way he dresses looks immediately dated, and perhaps even a bit sleazy (a la Leisure Suit Larry). I don’t actually like Craig much, but that is intentional, as he “wears his clothes with disdain” (quote from Vesper in Casino Royale), he’s shall we say, a bit too Sprezzatura to be the sexiest spy in the world.

So of course, if you cannot be like your hero, here on /malefashionadvice we talk about how we can look like your hero. And of course, we gotta talk about how you can look like your hero when you don’t have the MI6 picking up your bill. So today, I’m going to talk about the classic 90s Pierce Brosnan look and look at the half priced and quarter priced alternative.

Peak Pierce Brosnan style wise in my opinion starts from Remington Steele in the late 80s to After the Sunset in 2005. Personally my favorite is either Bond in The World is Not Enough, or Die Another Day and that look is the one I will be discussion today. Brosnan’s Bond worn a lot of different things over the years, but I think we can distill down his style as a suave, charming, ladies man into a few key characteristics: Dark Italian cut suit, solid color tie, and a dive watch. If you cannot picture it, consult this picture or this one.

So let’s start by looking at exactly what peak 90s James Bond wore:

90s James Bond wanted to ditch the dandy look of the 80s, and the conservative look of the 70s. His suiter of choice was Brioni, and he wore a suit that gave him a very sleek, modernized, international look. His suits were mostly single breasted, 2 button, four cuff buttons, double vented, notch lapels, patch pockets, and usually in a very dark navy. Impeccably hand stitched with a full canvas and perfect lapel roll, you can find his suit of choice from Brioni, $ 5,395.00.

His shirts and ties came from Turnbull & Asser. Mostly barrel cuff (they wanted to ditch the stuffy French cuff look for something sleeker) with three buttons and the classic T&A collar in a variety of whites and blues. The ties he wore were mostly silk in a plain or simple pattern like a houndstooth. Shirt: $395, and tie: $195.

Watch wise Pierce Brosnan was the first Bond to ditch the Rolex Submariner for the Omega Seamaster. As a watch fanatic, I really much prefer the Seamaster, as it just feels more modern, more avant-garde, and just a more unique look. Of course, over the years Omega changed the model a little bit, today’s Seamaster Professional is $4,400 for the steel on steel automatic version.

So overall, if you want the whole 90s Bond look with modern versions of the original pieces, it would cost you $10,385 + tax before any sales or discounts. Of course, that is without considering the shoes or accessories such as belts, tie bars and pocket squares. Sounds a bit steep isn’t it? Well, let’s look at the half-priced Bond, getting the look for under $5,000 shall we?

So first, we have to find a top quality Italian suit that isn’t too slim and that isn’t too fashion forward. We want that classic and timeless look that Brosnan effortlessly carries. My choice? Canali, with their contemporary fit really hits the notes. Mild waist suppression, medium width lapels, and, at only $1795, less than half the price of the Brioni. You still get the full canvas construction and quality wool, but of course, you’re losing out on the hand stitching.

There’s an issue with finding an alternative to the Turnbull & Asser shirt. Their signature is the 3 button barrel cuff, a style Bond is known to wear in the 90s. There are almost no other shirtmakers who would make it. But that grade of materials, worksmanship and collar spread? Find it at Eton for $245. Tie? Eton has a good medium width dark blue silk tie for $145.

As for the watch, you’re looking for a dive watch, steel on steel, colored (ceramic now, but back in the day aluminum) unidirectional scalloped edge bezel, with a simple date complication. Most dive watches have coin edge bezels a-la Submariner, the Omega style octagonal bezel is much more rare. I looked around, and well, after consulting A Blog to Watch, I think the next best avant-garde dive watch is well, made by the guys who claim to be “Swiss avant-garde”, the Tag Heuer Aquaracer ($2550).

So the “half priced Bond” look would set you back $4735 + tax before discounts. Of course, we can do even cheaper right? I mean, Tags aren’t exactly a value for money brand, and nobody is going to notice the difference between an expensive and a cheap tie really. Let’s look at an even cheaper way to get the Bond look, the 8th price fit.

So Brioni is a well-known Roman suiter. Suit Supply has well, a cut known as the Lazio cut. At a rough glance, yeah, Suit Supply’s Lazio cut is shall we say, heavily inspired by Brioni. I mean, sure, you’re not getting the luxurious top grade wool or full canvas construction, and the Suit Supply suit is a mass produced garment with minimal handiwork, but hey, at a glance, Suit Supply’s Lazio is essentially a poor man’s Brioni, and, only $569.

Shirt and Tie? Well, Charles Tyrwhitt makes a decent twill shirt and a silk tie at $49.75 for the shirt and $39 for the tie. Of course, in order to get this price, you have to buy more than one of each.

Finally, the watch. Finding a quality diver without a coin edge is quite frankly, not easy, especially if we want it to be a real, ISO certified dive watch. So how about the Certina DS action diver? Another member of the Swatch group like Omega, Certina is a quality swiss watchmaker, and their action diver is $895 MSRP. (I personally am an automatic guy, but if you’re just going for the look, the quartz Precidrive Action Diver has an MSRP of $675)

So the frugal version of the Brosnan look is $1554 (and I must remind you, you can save hundreds off that watch if you decide to go gray market instead of pay MSRP). Of course, again, all prices here are MSRP with no discounts what so ever. If you wait for a sale and go gray market, I actually think you can almost get this fit for under $1000.

So there you have it, the original Bond look with modern versions all the original pieces at $10,385 MSRP, the half-priced Bond fit at $4735, and the 8th (?) priced Bond at $1554. Of course, if you wanna ooze cool like him, you also have to sit there and practice your puns and remember to always keep your tip up.

PS: have a GF, wife, or other woman in your life? The lengendary orange bikini that ushered in puberty for millions of kids around the world is made by Eres, although I think they discontinued the exact model recently.
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Let's play a game: Fixing SPECTRE (X-post /r/truefilm)

There have been a fair number of really intelligent and thoughtful critiques (1, 2, 3) of Spectre since it came out, and I think it’d be fun to see if we can pick the movie apart and reassemble it to make it great.
My suggestion follows (with the obvious caveat that it’s totally arrogant to assume that I would have written a better movie originally, etc. This is just an exercise for fun). It’s rather long. Also if you like pictures and pretty formatting, you can find this post on Medium.

The Problems

The Story

Everything leading up to the infamous “cuckoo” line remains much the same: Bond kills Sciarra in Mexico, weathers New!M’s annoyance, teases Q, debriefs Moneypenny (we don’t see the faded picture brought back from Skyfall), and drives off to Rome with his cheeky grin (he’s cocky this time around; he’s beaten his fair share of supervillains, he’s at the top of his game). He nails Sciarra’s widow, tells the bouncer he’s Mickey Mouse, etc.
At the Spectre meeting we have our first change. The leaders of Spectre are no longer faceless suits; now there are people among them wearing bishop’s robes, decorated military uniforms, etc. There are a few police, as well, but no one seems concerned.
Instead of a business meeting, it almost feels like a party. People are drinking, laughing, talking shop. Bond draws a couple weird looks, but they’re not worried. Waltz is moving around the crowd, shaking hands, totally calm. He runs into Bond.
“James, isn’t it?” he says. “I was hoping we’d meet you tonight.” Bond doesn’t recognize him. He plays coy, and Waltz shuts him up. “We’ve got very special entertainment coming up. You won’t want to miss it.”
Bond is nonplussed. He hears a few people mention their business interests—trafficking of the sex and drug varieties, who’s going to kill the Pale King now, etc.—and his hackles are up.
Waltz draws everyone’s attention. “We have special guests tonight. If everyone would please welcome MI6 agent James Bond.” Applause and laughter from the crowd. Bond weathers it pretty well. “And, to cheer her up on this dreary evening, we have invited dear Lucia Sciarra.”
Doors open and Lucia is led in. She’s beat up. The group claps politely. Bond looks briefly shocked but keeps his cool.
Waltz makes a few jokes about Lucia being the sort of woman who doesn’t stay single for long, the sheets never get cold, etc. He gives Bond the cheesiest grin and then one of the henchmen shoots Lucia in the back. Waltz is still grinning.
Bond loses it and tries to fight his way forward; henchmen are on him in a hot second. He tears through several of them, and then Mr. Hinx has him in a headlock and three dudes have guns trained on him. Waltz talks to Lucia as she dies. “Your husband helped our organization become what it is today,” he says. “But we both know how easily he can be replaced.” He tilts his head at Hinx, indicating that they have found someone to assassinate the Pale King.
Bond slips away by the skin of his teeth and calls Moneypenny on the road, while Hinx follows him. This time, rather than asking her to search up Franz Oberhauser, he demands to know who the hell these people are. They meet with no attempt at secrecy; they murder a woman while surrounded by cops. What’s going on?
...I can’t fix the chase scene.
Back in London, M, Q, and C attend the vote for Nine Eyes. This plays out as before with the single opposing vote and M grilling C afterward, but this time C is slightly less obnoxious, more idealistic. He seems to believe that the 00 program is not only obsolete, but actively harmful. M gives his inspiring bit about the value of men in the field who make the horrible call of whether someone gets to live or die. C replies that Nine Eyes will be able to see the entire world in a glance; MI6 will see terrorist attacks before the perpetrator can buy his first barrel of explosives. But a man in the field can be bought, misled, or simply insubordinate. He plays Bond’s phone conversation, then quips that he’s not overawed by the “one man with a gun” model of intelligence.
Bond meets with Mr. White and gets his lead for Madeleine and L’Americain. When he tells Swann about her father, she angrily orders him out—and immediately starts preparing to leave once he does.
Bond gives Q the octopus ring. He sees Madeleine leave, but she doesn’t get far; Hinx arrives and captures her, leading to another chase scene I can’t fix.
After neutralizing Hinx, Bond and Swann meet with Q, who has not turned up much with the octopus ring except that there have been others like it, usually found on the bodies of terrorists. Madeleine jumps in to serve as Ms. Exposition: they’re all working for Spectre, a shadowy group made up of incredibly powerful, ambitious people. Q recognizes the name, but argues it’s an urban legend. If a counterintelligence agency existed and opposed MI6, surely they would know about it. Madeleine agrees. “Your superiors do know about it,” she says. “And there’s nothing they can do.” Spectre’s leaders have bought all the right people; even when some of them are imprisoned or killed, more rise up to take their place.
Spectre brings out the worst in the human species, she tells them. And it can’t be stopped; not with bullets, not with brave men. Their leader, Franz Oberhauser, is not some lynchpin to be removed. The worst they could do is inconvenience the organization.
Bond brushes this off; he and Madeleine make for L’Americain. Madeleine is clearly shell-shocked from her ordeal so far, and takes a shower. She makes it very clear to Bond that he won’t be joining her.
They find Mr. White’s stash of clues and head to the desert by train. Meanwhile, in London, the holdout African vote swings in favor of Nine Eyes. M confronts C, heavily implying that C somehow orchestrated a terrorist attack to further his goals. C is outraged that M would accuse him of something so despicable. “If this is the kind of logic the 00 program uses to ‘get its man,’” he says, “I feel proud to have ended it.”
Bond and Swann talk on the train, but this time there is more to their conversation than Bond extolling the virtues of the Sig Sauer. Madeleine pegs Bond as a maladjusted young man who struggles to connect because of numerous failed relationships in his past. She sees right through him; she’s a trained psychologist, she reminds him, and her father was an assassin. She can read Bond like a trashy magazine.
Bond—and the astute portion of the audience—recognizes the parallels to his first conversation with Vesper. He changes the subject back to guns.
Hinx attacks Bond and Swann on the train. They beat him; this time Madeleine manages to get a meaningful hit in against Hinx, rather than being a two-second distraction. Relieved and exhilarated from the fight, the two leads get busy in their train compartment.
They arrive at Oberhauser’s compound. The mind games play out much the same way; they’re welcomed in with no problems, Bond gives up his gun, Swann finds a dress on her bed. Bond finds pictures of M and Vesper in his room.
Oberhauser welcomes Swann and Bond to his meteor room. Instead of waxing eloquent about how James entered his life and stole Daddy’s love, this time he’s simply pissed about the times Bond mucked his plans. Quantum existed as a subsidiary of Spectre, and Bond’s successes against them have made Waltz’s life troublesome.
He shows off his panopticon room and brags about being connected to all the information in the world—we see Bond blink, making an intuitive leap, but he says nothing. He plays the clip of Bond and White; Bond urges Madeleine to look away. She does, but Oberhauser grabs her face and forces her roughly to stare at the screen. Bond tries to interfere, but doesn’t get far before a billy club brings him down.
Bond wakes up in the torture room. Oberhauser notes that Spectre has a very specific policy about troublesome people: buy them or remove them. Mr. Hinx was supposed to fix the problem, but now….
“It has been a long time since I involved myself,” Oberhauser says. “I don’t want to get lax, you know? Old and fat and lazy? How boring.”
He delivers a monologue about torture that is markedly similar to the one in the film, this time revolving around Lucia Sciarra instead of the nameless Spectre agent. “There was no one inside her skull.” He begins to torture Bond with the needles. Screaming. Blood. For at least one shot, we’re inside Bond’s head as the room seems to tip sideways and Oberhauser gloats about how easy it is to disrupt Bond’s sense of balance. Bond looks ready to puke.
Oberhauser leers at Swann as he tortures Bond. “Do you love him? What would you give me for his freedom? Would you take off all your clothes and dance? Give me all your earthly possessions? Sell me national secrets?”
Madeleine maintains a stiff upper lip and tells Oberhauser to go to hell. Oberhauser takes it in stride and tells her matter-of-factly that he will be removing Bond’s ability to recognize faces, so she had better say goodbye. Bond gets the watch to her; it explodes in time to save him from further torture.
Swann and Bond begin fighting their way out of the compound, though Bond’s balance is thrown all to hell and it’s making his aim poor. Madeleine takes the gun—not enthusiastically—and Bond guides her strategy: “shoot there, shoot there, wait. He’s cornered, another one will be hiding there.” They put bullets in a number of strategic places, rather than a single oil barrel. The compound goes up in flames.
They escape via helicopter, and Bond fills in Swann (and the few members of the audience who haven’t caught on yet) that C is one of Spectre’s agents, and they need to shut him—and Nine Eyes—down as soon as possible.
They meet up with Q, M, and Moneypenny in London and debrief as before. As they mobilize, Madeleine admits to Bond that she’s been ignoring something for too long: she wants no part in this life. She understands if James can’t give it up. “I wish you could.” She leaves.
Bond & Co. hash out a plan of attack as they drive, but midway through Bond receives a cryptic text from Madeleine’s number, from which he deduces that she’s been captured and taken to Old!MI6. He sends M, Q, and Moneypenny to handle C at New!MI6 while he tears off to save Swann.
Meanwhile, at New!MI6, C is working late. There’s a prominently placed countdown clock for the Nine Eyes launch. He gets a notification from the computer—it’s found aberrant data. It shows him assorted video clips of Madeleine’s capture on the road and her being taken to Old!MI6 and tied up in a room. He tells the computer to notify police. The system confirms the police will arrive in five minutes, then informs C that the demolitions in the building have been set to a timer inconsistent with regulation; the system flags it as highly suspicious. C looks out his window at the condemned building, and sets his jaw. He leaves MI6 at speed.
M, Q, and Moneypenny arrive moments later and shut down Nine Eyes.
Bond arrives at Old!MI6 and finds the graffitied arrows to guide him. Oberhauser appears (uninjured) behind the bulletproof glass (gotta get that iconic shot…that didn’t end up in the movie). Oberhauser sneers that Bond has proven more frustrating than he could have predicted; Oberhauser can’t simply kill him anymore. No, Bond has to be punished. Oberhauser taunts him with the opportunity to save Madeleine or himself before calmly leaving. Bond is furious but only for a moment. He runs back into the building, opening door after door, screaming Madeleine’s name.
We jump to a door opening to see Madeleine tied up, gagged, surrounded by wires. She’s horrified to see that her rescuer is not Bond, but C. He unties her, faltering from nerves, and explains anxiously that a terrorist has got control of the demolition in the building, it’s going to be blowing up shortly, and they both need to get out of there.
Swann does not seem convinced that C is friendly. The moment she’s free she sprints out of the room. C follows her, looking confused and more than a little terrified.
Bond and Madeleine run into each other and have no time for romance. “There’s a bomb—” “I know, this way.” As Madeleine runs to their timely exit via rope net, Bond spots C running down the corridor. C is relieved, and calls out to 007. Still believing C to be one of Oberhauser’s allies, Bond shoots him. C falls to the ground. He begins to bleed out, and mutters, darkly, “One man with a gun.”
Bond and Madeleine escape via boat as the building explodes. They shoot down Oberhauser’s helicopter, and Bond gets his moment of being The Good Guy by refusing to shoot Oberhauser dead in the face. Oberhauser threatens that as long as he lives, he will seek ways to claw the soul out of Bond’s life. Bond is mighty confident that this won’t turn out well for Oberhauser. M and Q arrive and arrest Oberhauser while Bond throws his gun away and walks into the sunset with Madeleine Swann.
We skip the scene of Bond collecting his Signature Cool Car from MI6 for two reasons: one, we’ve already shown him heading off for romantic bliss with a smart, capable woman who gets him and we don’t need to do it again.
Two, there’s one more scene before this movie’s done:
We’re at another Spectre office party. The mood is more somber than the last one. Someone offers a toast to Franz Oberhauser, who helped make their organization what it is today, and who will be replaced, but only with great difficulty; the Spectre members raise their glasses respectfully. The toast-maker goes on to say that in loss, there is always gain, and today, they welcome “a man who has come back from death and seen the entire world in a glance. In his new life, he has taken a new name, and new purpose: to destroy the people who murdered him in cold blood.”
He stands aside to reveal C, bound to a wheelchair, with a horrid scar over one eye. “Please welcome Mr. Ernst Blofeld.”
END
submitted by chandlerjbirch to movies [link] [comments]

Let's play a game: Fixing SPECTRE

There have been a fair number of really intelligent and thoughtful critiques of Spectre on this sub, and I think it’d be fun to see if we can pick the movie apart and reassemble it to make it great. Do not fail me, /TrueFilm!
My suggestion follows (with the obvious caveat that it’s totally arrogant to assume that I would have written a better movie originally, etc. This is just an exercise for fun). It’s rather long. Also if you like pictures and pretty formatting, you can find this post on Medium.

The Problems

The Story

Everything leading up to the infamous “cuckoo” line remains much the same: Bond kills Sciarra in Mexico, weathers New!M’s annoyance, teases Q, debriefs Moneypenny (we don’t see the faded picture brought back from Skyfall), and drives off to Rome with his cheeky grin (he’s cocky this time around; he’s beaten his fair share of supervillains, he’s at the top of his game). He nails Sciarra’s widow, tells the bouncer he’s Mickey Mouse, etc.
At the Spectre meeting we have our first change. The leaders of Spectre are no longer faceless suits; now there are people among them wearing bishop’s robes, decorated military uniforms, etc. There are a few police, as well, but no one seems concerned.
Instead of a business meeting, it almost feels like a party. People are drinking, laughing, talking shop. Bond draws a couple weird looks, but they’re not worried. Waltz is moving around the crowd, shaking hands, totally calm. He runs into Bond.
“James, isn’t it?” he says. “I was hoping we’d meet you tonight.” Bond doesn’t recognize him. He plays coy, and Waltz shuts him up. “We’ve got very special entertainment coming up. You won’t want to miss it.”
Bond is nonplussed. He hears a few people mention their business interests—trafficking of the sex and drug varieties, who’s going to kill the Pale King now, etc.—and his hackles are up.
Waltz draws everyone’s attention. “We have special guests tonight. If everyone would please welcome MI6 agent James Bond.” Applause and laughter from the crowd. Bond weathers it pretty well. “And, to cheer her up on this dreary evening, we have invited dear Lucia Sciarra.”
Doors open and Lucia is led in. She’s beat up. The group claps politely. Bond looks briefly shocked but keeps his cool.
Waltz makes a few jokes about Lucia being the sort of woman who doesn’t stay single for long, the sheets never get cold, etc. He gives Bond the cheesiest grin and then one of the henchmen shoots Lucia in the back. Waltz is still grinning.
Bond loses it and tries to fight his way forward; henchmen are on him in a hot second. He tears through several of them, and then Mr. Hinx has him in a headlock and three dudes have guns trained on him. Waltz talks to Lucia as she dies. “Your husband helped our organization become what it is today,” he says. “But we both know how easily he can be replaced.” He tilts his head at Hinx, indicating that they have found someone to assassinate the Pale King.
Bond slips away by the skin of his teeth and calls Moneypenny on the road, while Hinx follows him. This time, rather than asking her to search up Franz Oberhauser, he demands to know who the hell these people are. They meet with no attempt at secrecy; they murder a woman while surrounded by cops. What’s going on?
...I can’t fix the chase scene.
Back in London, M, Q, and C attend the vote for Nine Eyes. This plays out as before with the single opposing vote and M grilling C afterward, but this time C is slightly less obnoxious, more idealistic. He seems to believe that the 00 program is not only obsolete, but actively harmful. M gives his inspiring bit about the value of men in the field who make the horrible call of whether someone gets to live or die. C replies that Nine Eyes will be able to see the entire world in a glance; MI6 will see terrorist attacks before the perpetrator can buy his first barrel of explosives. But a man in the field can be bought, misled, or simply insubordinate. He plays Bond’s phone conversation, then quips that he’s not overawed by the “one man with a gun” model of intelligence.
Bond meets with Mr. White and gets his lead for Madeleine and L’Americain. When he tells Swann about her father, she angrily orders him out—and immediately starts preparing to leave once he does.
Bond gives Q the octopus ring. He sees Madeleine leave, but she doesn’t get far; Hinx arrives and captures her, leading to another chase scene I can’t fix.
After neutralizing Hinx, Bond and Swann meet with Q, who has not turned up much with the octopus ring except that there have been others like it, usually found on the bodies of terrorists. Madeleine jumps in to serve as Ms. Exposition: they’re all working for Spectre, a shadowy group made up of incredibly powerful, ambitious people. Q recognizes the name, but argues it’s an urban legend. If a counterintelligence agency existed and opposed MI6, surely they would know about it. Madeleine agrees. “Your superiors do know about it,” she says. “And there’s nothing they can do.” Spectre’s leaders have bought all the right people; even when some of them are imprisoned or killed, more rise up to take their place.
Spectre brings out the worst in the human species, she tells them. And it can’t be stopped; not with bullets, not with brave men. Their leader, Franz Oberhauser, is not some lynchpin to be removed. The worst they could do is inconvenience the organization.
Bond brushes this off; he and Madeleine make for L’Americain. Madeleine is clearly shell-shocked from her ordeal so far, and takes a shower. She makes it very clear to Bond that he won’t be joining her.
They find Mr. White’s stash of clues and head to the desert by train. Meanwhile, in London, the holdout African vote swings in favor of Nine Eyes. M confronts C, heavily implying that C somehow orchestrated a terrorist attack to further his goals. C is outraged that M would accuse him of something so despicable. “If this is the kind of logic the 00 program uses to ‘get its man,’” he says, “I feel proud to have ended it.”
Bond and Swann talk on the train, but this time there is more to their conversation than Bond extolling the virtues of the Sig Sauer. Madeleine pegs Bond as a maladjusted young man who struggles to connect because of numerous failed relationships in his past. She sees right through him; she’s a trained psychologist, she reminds him, and her father was an assassin. She can read Bond like a trashy magazine.
Bond—and the astute portion of the audience—recognizes the parallels to his first conversation with Vesper. He changes the subject back to guns.
Hinx attacks Bond and Swann on the train. They beat him; this time Madeleine manages to get a meaningful hit in against Hinx, rather than being a two-second distraction. Relieved and exhilarated from the fight, the two leads get busy in their train compartment.
They arrive at Oberhauser’s compound. The mind games play out much the same way; they’re welcomed in with no problems, Bond gives up his gun, Swann finds a dress on her bed. Bond finds pictures of M and Vesper in his room.
Oberhauser welcomes Swann and Bond to his meteor room. Instead of waxing eloquent about how James entered his life and stole Daddy’s love, this time he’s simply pissed about the times Bond mucked his plans. Quantum existed as a subsidiary of Spectre, and Bond’s successes against them have made Waltz’s life troublesome.
He shows off his panopticon room and brags about being connected to all the information in the world—we see Bond blink, making an intuitive leap, but he says nothing. He plays the clip of Bond and White; Bond urges Madeleine to look away. She does, but Oberhauser grabs her face and forces her roughly to stare at the screen. Bond tries to interfere, but doesn’t get far before a billy club brings him down.
Bond wakes up in the torture room. Oberhauser notes that Spectre has a very specific policy about troublesome people: buy them or remove them. Mr. Hinx was supposed to fix the problem, but now….
“It has been a long time since I involved myself,” Oberhauser says. “I don’t want to get lax, you know? Old and fat and lazy? How boring.”
He delivers a monologue about torture that is markedly similar to the one in the film, this time revolving around Lucia Sciarra instead of the nameless Spectre agent. “There was no one inside her skull.” He begins to torture Bond with the needles. Screaming. Blood. For at least one shot, we’re inside Bond’s head as the room seems to tip sideways and Oberhauser gloats about how easy it is to disrupt Bond’s sense of balance. Bond looks ready to puke.
Oberhauser leers at Swann as he tortures Bond. “Do you love him? What would you give me for his freedom? Would you take off all your clothes and dance? Give me all your earthly possessions? Sell me national secrets?”
Madeleine maintains a stiff upper lip and tells Oberhauser to go to hell. Oberhauser takes it in stride and tells her matter-of-factly that he will be removing Bond’s ability to recognize faces, so she had better say goodbye. Bond gets the watch to her; it explodes in time to save him from further torture.
Swann and Bond begin fighting their way out of the compound, though Bond’s balance is thrown all to hell and it’s making his aim poor. Madeleine takes the gun—not enthusiastically—and Bond guides her strategy: “shoot there, shoot there, wait. He’s cornered, another one will be hiding there.” They put bullets in a number of strategic places, rather than a single oil barrel. The compound goes up in flames.
They escape via helicopter, and Bond fills in Swann (and the few members of the audience who haven’t caught on yet) that C is one of Spectre’s agents, and they need to shut him—and Nine Eyes—down as soon as possible.
They meet up with Q, M, and Moneypenny in London and debrief as before. As they mobilize, Madeleine admits to Bond that she’s been ignoring something for too long: she wants no part in this life. She understands if James can’t give it up. “I wish you could.” She leaves.
Bond & Co. hash out a plan of attack as they drive, but midway through Bond receives a cryptic text from Madeleine’s number, from which he deduces that she’s been captured and taken to Old!MI6. He sends M, Q, and Moneypenny to handle C at New!MI6 while he tears off to save Swann.
Meanwhile, at New!MI6, C is working late. There’s a prominently placed countdown clock for the Nine Eyes launch. He gets a notification from the computer—it’s found aberrant data. It shows him assorted video clips of Madeleine’s capture on the road and her being taken to Old!MI6 and tied up in a room. He tells the computer to notify police. The system confirms the police will arrive in five minutes, then informs C that the demolitions in the building have been set to a timer inconsistent with regulation; the system flags it as highly suspicious. C looks out his window at the condemned building, and sets his jaw. He leaves MI6 at speed.
M, Q, and Moneypenny arrive moments later and shut down Nine Eyes.
Bond arrives at Old!MI6 and finds the graffitied arrows to guide him. Oberhauser appears (uninjured) behind the bulletproof glass (gotta get that iconic shot…that didn’t end up in the movie). Oberhauser sneers that Bond has proven more frustrating than he could have predicted; Oberhauser can’t simply kill him anymore. No, Bond has to be punished. Oberhauser taunts him with the opportunity to save Madeleine or himself before calmly leaving. Bond is furious but only for a moment. He runs back into the building, opening door after door, screaming Madeleine’s name.
We jump to a door opening to see Madeleine tied up, gagged, surrounded by wires. She’s horrified to see that her rescuer is not Bond, but C. He unties her, faltering from nerves, and explains anxiously that a terrorist has got control of the demolition in the building, it’s going to be blowing up shortly, and they both need to get out of there.
Swann does not seem convinced that C is friendly. The moment she’s free she sprints out of the room. C follows her, looking confused and more than a little terrified.
Bond and Madeleine run into each other and have no time for romance. “There’s a bomb—” “I know, this way.” As Madeleine runs to their timely exit via rope net, Bond spots C running down the corridor. C is relieved, and calls out to 007. Still believing C to be one of Oberhauser’s allies, Bond shoots him. C falls to the ground. He begins to bleed out, and mutters, darkly, “One man with a gun.”
Bond and Madeleine escape via boat as the building explodes. They shoot down Oberhauser’s helicopter, and Bond gets his moment of being The Good Guy by refusing to shoot Oberhauser dead in the face. Oberhauser threatens that as long as he lives, he will seek ways to claw the soul out of Bond’s life. Bond is mighty confident that this won’t turn out well for Oberhauser. M and Q arrive and arrest Oberhauser while Bond throws his gun away and walks into the sunset with Madeleine Swann.
We skip the scene of Bond collecting his Signature Cool Car from MI6 for two reasons: one, we’ve already shown him heading off for romantic bliss with a smart, capable woman who gets him and we don’t need to do it again.
Two, there’s one more scene before this movie’s done:
We’re at another Spectre office party. The mood is more somber than the last one. Someone offers a toast to Franz Oberhauser, who helped make their organization what it is today, and who will be replaced, but only with great difficulty; the Spectre members raise their glasses respectfully. The toast-maker goes on to say that in loss, there is always gain, and today, they welcome “a man who has come back from death and seen the entire world in a glance. In his new life, he has taken a new name, and new purpose: to destroy the people who murdered him in cold blood.”
He stands aside to reveal C, bound to a wheelchair, with a horrid scar over one eye. “Please welcome Mr. Ernst Blofeld.”
END
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Casino Royal - James Bond besa a Vesper - YouTube Casino Royale  Vesper and James End Scenes 4k - YouTube Casino Royale (1967) - Vesper is Kidnapped Scene (6/10 ... Vesper and Bond Arrived in Montenegro  Color Corrected ... Recreated - Vesper Martini from Casino Royale - YouTube Casino Royale - Vesper theme - YouTube CASINO ROYALE  Bond meets Vesper - YouTube James Bond Shows His Softer Side (Casino Royale Shower ...

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Casino Royal - James Bond besa a Vesper - YouTube

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